Renaming the Cuts of Meat…

After 40 years, the names for cuts of meat are being revamped to make it easier for consumers to understand what they’re buying and how to cook it. The labels are shorter and less anatomically based than the names used today for cuts of meats. Pork cuts are now more in sync with the beef cuts consumers are familiar with. The new names and labels should start appearing this summer, just in time for grilling season.

Loin (Pork):

Old

New

Pork Loin Top Loin Chop

Porterhouse Chop

Top Loin Pork Chops

New York Chops

A Pork Loin Rib Chop

Ribeye Chop

Bone-In Pork Loin Chop

T-Bone Chop

Chuck (Beef):

Old

New

Beef Chuck Eye Edge

Pot Roast, Boneless

Denver Roast

Beef Shoulder Top Blade Steak

Boneless Flat Iron

Flat Iron Steak

Sirloin (Beef):

Old

New

Beef Loin Top Sirloin Steak,

Boneless, Cap Off

Top Sirloin Steak

Beef Loin Top Sirloin Cubes

For Kabobs

Kabobs

 

With the new names come new labels for meat. They’ll now identify the species (at this point just beef or pork), whether it’s from the chuck, rib, loin or round, the retail cut name and provide cooking instructions.

The purpose of the naming system is help customers identify cuts with familiar cooking methods. When customers see the word “Porterhouse”, they might think- hey I could put this on the grill…

Most names consumers know and love won’t be changing, but after two years of research it became apparent that Americans needed more clarity when they inspected the meat case, said the director of market intelligence for the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association in Denver.

The new pork names go with a shift in how pork is cooked, compared to the terms used in the 1970’s when these names were first implemented. Because trichinosis is no longer a problem in U.S. hogs, in 2011 the Department of Agriculture changed the recommended cooking temperature for pork from 160 degrees F to 145 degrees F. Once pork could be pink, a pork chop could be cooked just like a steak.

Although the pork producers “love their friends in the beef world” they want to remind grillers that while beef prices are at an all-time high because of the drought and resulting spikes in feed costs, pork is now inexpensive “and will be through summer.”

Chop, Chop! article

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Hormone Replacement Therapy Increases Risk For Breast Cancer

A new analysis of data from the Women’s Health Initiative now casts doubt on previous researcher’s findings that taking hormone replacement therapy (HRT) isn’t dangerous. The study, published Friday by the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, concludes that the prognosis for cancers related to hormone replacement therapy is just as dire as for other breast cancers. As a result, women who turn to the treatment are more likely to die of breast cancer than their non-hormone-taking peers.

The principal investigator for the Women’s Health Initiative and lead author of the new study stated, “You could fill a basketball arena with the women who get the disease.” “It seems like you’d want to reach a higher threshold before you take it.”

Nearly 70,000 postmenopausal women participated in randomized clinical trials as part of the Women’s Health Initiative project. The study participants who took estrogen plus progestin had higher rates of breast cancer diagnoses and of breast cancer deaths.

At the same time, more than 90,000 additional women took part in a related observational study that tracked details about their health and hormone use over an average of 11 years. Along with other observational studies, this one found that women who took hormones to treat menopause symptoms and got breast cancer were less likely to die from the illness than women who got breast cancer without taking hormones.

So he and his team identified a subset of more than 41,000 women from the observational study who more closely matched the women who took part in the randomized trial. In doing so, the researchers set aside data on women who were not using hormones when they participated in a study but had taken them in the past — a factor that had the potential to complicate the findings.

The new results fell more closely in line with the findings from the original randomized trial: Survival after breast cancer was similar for both hormone users and non-users. Tumors that arose in women who took hormones were no less deadly.

They had appeared to be, however, because women who had taken hormones years before might have already developed aggressive cancers and would not have been able to participate in the study in the first place.

HRT Study

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