Does Chipotle Really Care About Our Access to “Real Food”?

Chipotle Mexican Grill has created a new game application and video that they are hoping will lure consumers into eating more “real” food. Their goal is to steer consumers away from factory-made, highly processed junk food.

The company’s chief marketing officer was quoted by saying:

“We created ‘The Scarecrow’ game and film as an entertaining and engaging way to help people better understand the difference between processed food and the real thing. In many ways, ‘The Scarecrow’ represents what we aspire to accomplish through our vision of Food With Integrity.”

 The company’s latest animated short film made its way around the Internet, earning praises from advertising critics and consumers, while angering those within the agricultural industry. According to Chipotle, the film and its coordinating game are “designed to help educate people about the world of industrial food production that supplies much of what they eat.”

To the agriculture community, however, the film does nothing but further mislead consumers.

But, keep in mind that Chipotle was formerly owned and operated by the fast food powerhouse McDonald’s. The company separated from McDonald’s in 2006. Read these articles below and see how you feel about Chipotle capitalizing on the “real food” movement.

With Food Day approaching on October 24th, I think it’s coincidental that these restaurants are coming out with advertisements like these. Did I fail to mention that Food Day’s theme this year is “Eat Real”?

The Chipotle Scarecrow

The Scarecrow App

The Harm in the Chipotle Scarecrow

The Washington Post- Problem with Chipotle

Farmers Response to Chipotle

11 Things McDonalds Doesn’t Want You to Know

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Sixty Five Roses

Cystic fibrosis is the most common fatal genetic disorder in North America. The disorder produces thick, sticky mucus secretions that may seriously impair the function of multiple organs in the body. Most notably, these organs are the pancreas and lungs. Just a few decades ago, an infant born with CF seldom survived to adulthood. Today, the outlook is much brighter, with adults reaching their 30’s, 40’s, and some even into their 50’s.

Cystic fibrosis has three major consequences: chronic lung disease, pancreatic insufficiency, and abnormally high electrolyte concentrations in the sweat. Chronic lung disease develops because the airways in the lungs become congested with mucus, causing breathings to be strenuous. As the thick mucus stagnates in the bronchial tubes, bacteria multiply there. Lung infections are the usual cause of death in people with cystic fibrosis.

Cystic fibrosis causes some degree of pancreatic insufficiency in all cases, with about 90% of cases serious enough to require enzyme replacement therapy. With aging, damage to the pancreas deteriorates. The thick mucus obstructs the pancreatic ducts and interferes with the secretion of digestive enzymes, pancreatic juices, and pancreatic hormones. Eventually, the pancreatic cells are surrounded by mucus and are gradually replaced by fibrous tissues. Malabsorption of many nutrients including fat, protein, vitamins, and minerals often leads to malnutrition. Additionally, the secretion of insulin may be affected resulting in glucose intolerance and diabetes.

The therapy of cystic fibrosis aims to promote appropriate growth and development and prevent respiratory failure and complications. Treatment includes respiratory, diet, and drug therapy.

Nutrient losses through malabsorption, frequent infections, rapid turnover rate of protein and essential fatty acids, high protein catabolism, and high basal energy expenditures raise energy needs for people with cystic fibrosis to between 120%-150% of the RDA for gender and age. Extra energy is needed simply to breathe. RDs estimate individual energy requirements based on basal metabolic rate, activity level, pulmonary function, and degree of malabsorption.

Obtaining enough energy can be complicated, but because people with CF frequently experience a loss of appetite that is aggravated by repeated infections, emotional stress, and drug therapy. Coughing to clear the lungs may trigger vomiting or reflux of foods from the stomach. Thus the person with cystic fibrosis finds it difficult to take in enough food energy, protein, and other nutrients to meet needs.

NIH- Cystic Fibrosis

Cystic Fibrosis Foundation

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Who is Howard Graham Buffett and Why Does he Care about Food Security?

If you had the resources to accomplish something great in the world, what would you do?

Legendary investor Warren Buffett posed this challenge to his son in 2006, when he announced he was leaving the bulk of his fortune to philanthropy. Howard G. Buffett set out to help the most vulnerable people on earth – nearly a billion individuals who lack basic food security. And Howard has given himself a deadline: 40 years to put more than $3 billion to work on this challenge.

Each of us has about 40 chances to accomplish our goals in life. This is a lesson Howard learned through his passion for farming. All farmers can expect to have about 40 growing seasons, giving them just 40 chances to improve on every harvest. This applies to all of us, however, because we all have about 40 productive years to do the best job we can, whatever our passions or goals may be.

40 Chances: Finding Hope in a Hungry World is a new book that captures Howard’s journey. Beginning with his love for farming, we join him around the world as he seeks out new approaches to ease the suffering of so many. It is told in a unique format: 40 stories that will provide readers a compelling look at Howard’s lessons learned, ranging from his own backyard to some of the most difficult and dangerous places on Earth.

Who are the authors of this book?

Howard G. Buffett is the founder and President of the Howard G. Buffett Foundation, a private philanthropic foundation which strengthens food security for vulnerable populations throughout the world. A farmer, businessman, politician, photographer, and philanthropist, Howard has dedicated his life to wildlife conservation and finding solutions to world hunger. He has traveled to over 120 countries documenting the challenges of preserving our biodiversity while providing adequate resources to meet the needs of a growing global population. Howard is a United Nations Goodwill Ambassador Against Hunger, and serves on the corporate boards of Berkshire Hathaway, Coca-Cola Company, and Lindsay Corporation. He operates a 1,500-acre family farm in central Illinois and oversees three foundation-operated research farms, including 1,400 acres in Arizona, 3,200 acres in Illinois, and 9,200 acres in South Africa.

Howard W. Buffett is the Executive Director of the Howard G. Buffett Foundation. He previously served in the U.S. Department of Defense overseeing agriculture-based economic stabilization and redevelopment programs in Iraq and Afghanistan. For his work, he received the Joint Civilian Service Commendation Award – the highest ranking civilian honor presented by the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Prior to that, Howard was a Policy Advisor for the White House Domestic Policy Council, where he co-authored and directed the President’s cross-sector partnerships strategy. He earned a BA from Northwestern University and an MPA in Advanced Management and Finance from Columbia University. He is from Omaha, Nebraska, where he and his wife operate a 400 acre no-till farm.

What are the Principles of 40 Chances?

1.)   Roots: Dig in. Am I acting with purpose and urgency in my life?

2.)   Bravery: Grow tall. Am I taking smart risks?

3.)   Lessons: Don’t fear mistakes. Am I learning the right lessons from my mistakes?

4.)   Challenges: Be adaptable. Am I improving upon every chance I have?

5.)   Hope: Prepare for tomorrow. Am I making the most of my chances in life?

Planting the seeds for long lasting impact.

40 Chances Programs advocate for the best ideas that seed sustainable, transformational change in accomplishing global food security. These programs will empower our next generation of leaders to develop market-based solutions to some of society’s most pressing challenges in the areas of poverty and hunger.

40 Chances Programs

1.)   For High School Students: High school students across the country can compete for awards based on solutions they design to combat local food insecurity.

2.)   For College Students: 40 Chances Program will focus on seeding innovative ideas and plans from college students across the country,

3.)   For Post Graduates: 40 Chances Program will focus on seeding innovative ideas from recent post graduates.

4.)   For Start-Ups: The program will focus on seeding innovative ideas from start-up nonprofit organizations.

Authors of the book

Authors of the book

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