Eating After a Lap-Band Surgery

In the recent news of New Jersey’s Governor Chris Christie’s efforts to lose weight, it’s important for people everywhere to really understand the extent of a lap-band surgery.  So far the New Jersey native has lost 40 pounds. But, it’s important to keep in mind, after having major surgery like this, that maintaining weight loss will be attributable to adopting a healthy diet and lifestyle. Here are some diet tips to follow after lap-band surgery:

        Eat small portions

o   Limiting portion sizes is essential to patients after having surgery. A lap-band surgery decreases the size of your stomach and could even make it painful to consume large quantities of food. It is recommended that patient also eat slowly and chew their food thoroughly to avoid discomfort.

        Focus on high protein foods

o   Proteins provide a sense of satiety and fullness. But, focusing on soft proteins is important after surgery. Some examples of soft proteins are Greek yogurt, low-sodium soups, or cottage cheese.

        Avoid drinking and eating at the same time

o   Avoiding the consumption of drinking and eating at the same time is one of the most important rules to follow post-surgery. Staying hydrated is very important as well. So patients should stop drinking at least 10 minutes before eating and then avoid drinking at least 45 minutes after finishing a meal. The main concern here is to prevent vomiting from occurring.

        Limit pasta, rice, and bread

o    Since eating fiber is healthy for people without surgery, it is not suggested that it should be avoided completely. Most patients simply do not tolerate pastas and bread products because they absorb fluids and expand. These types of foods can make patients feel uncomfortable and too full.

        Consume soft fruits and vegetables

o   In the first few weeks post-surgery, patients will need to puree fruits and vegetables. Later these patients can introduce whole fruits and vegetables. The skins of fruits and vegetables (like apple skins or cucumber skins).

The main message that people should know is that lap-band surgery is a tool to maintain weight in patients. The surgery is not a quick-fix or a solution. It is only efficient if the patient is aware of what they’re putting in their stomach and how much of it as well.

What to eat after lap-band surgery

lap-band

Advertisements

The “Salt Calculator” Has Arrived!

The “Salt Calculator” Has Arrived!

Now Americans can take that extra step at reducing their sodium intake when eating out or cooking at home. A new online “salt calculator” jointly developed by a Toronto dietitian aims to encourage Canadians to curb the unhealthy quantities of sodium gulped down daily. So, why not Americans too, right?

The results can be staggering, said a University of Toronto postdoctoral fellow who developed the calculator with researchers from the Ottawa Hospital Research Institute and the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences.

“Many people are surprised about how high their sodium intake is,” she said, adding that more than three-quarters of consumed sodium is “hidden” in processed foods and prepared meals.

“It was really to engage people about the amount of sodium in their diet,” “It’s really making high sodium intake personal.”

On average, Canadians consume about 3,400 milligrams of sodium per day, more than double Health Canada’s recommended “adequate intake” level. This can lead to high blood pressure and an increased risk of stroke, heart problems, kidney disease and other health problems like osteoporosis and stomach cancer, according to Health Canada.

There are hopes this calculator can act as a wake-up call to many who are unaware they are consuming risky levels sodium, and serve as a tool for doctors to bring up the issue with their patients. It also breaks down the sources of one’s salt consumption, suggesting what changes will help bring it down.

“People cannot make effective dietary changes unless they are aware that they personally are consuming high amounts of sodium,” she said. “Through the calculator, we do hope to show people that.”

Salt Calculator article

Salt Calculator

The calculator asks questions regarding the user, like age and gender. Then dives right into everyone’s “hidden secrets” and asks questions regarding eating out:

  • Lunch/dinner from quick-service or fast-food restaurants (eat-in or take-out)
  • Lunch/dinner from table-service restaurants (eat-in or take-out)
  • Breakfast from quick-service or fast-food restaurants (eat-in or take-out
  • Breakfast from table-service restaurants (eat-in or take-out)

Other areas of interest that the calculator takes into consideration are:

How often you eat these foods prepared or eaten at home

  • Bread products
  • Baked goods
  • Breakfast cereal and hot instant cereal

Processed meats, fish, and poultry

  • Processed meat products
  • Frozen or pre-seasoned meat, poultry, and fish
  • Canned tuna and salmon & smoked fish

Cheese & Dairy

  • Cheese eaten alone or with other food
  • Milk as a hot or cold drink & milk in cereal

Canned vegetables

  • Canned vegetables, legumes, pickles & olives

Added salt

  • Add a dash or shake of salt to food

Spreads, Condiments, Dips Sauces

  • Condiments & dips
  • Prepared sauces & marinades

Prepared Meals, Sides & Soups

  • Pasta and rice dishes with sauce/seasonings, and packaged mashed/scalloped potatoes and stuffing dishes
  • Frozen appetizers & side dishes
  • Frozen entrees & meals
  • Canned chili, stew & pasta or baked beans with sauce
  • Pizza or pizza snacks
  • Soup, broth, oriental noodles & bouillon

Salty Snacks

  • Salty snack foods i.e., potato chips, pretzels, popcorn, peanuts, other nuts.

salt calc

Free Play Saturday 2: CDMWV

Service Learning with the Children’s Discovery Museum of West Virginia

For the second Saturday in the month of January, WVU’s Human Nutrition & Food undergraduates were staffed and participated in an event at the Children’s Discovery Museum of West Virginia, called “Free Play Saturday”. Free Play Saturday consists of 3 events in January, where the undergraduates, ISPP Dietetic Interns, and graduate students have demonstrations, activities, and displays for children and parent participants. The events are taking place the last 3 Saturdays this month and our table have themes for each event. Our three themes consist of:

  1. Crave Your FAV Rainbow
  2. Feed Your Brain, Go With Grain
  3. Sugar Shockers

Experiences like these are ideal service learning opportunities for students at every level. These events give students exposure to children of younger ages and also practice their community nutrition skills, away from campus-aged individuals.

At last Saturday’s event, “Feed Your Brain, Go With Grain”  was the theme. We had different activities for the children participating:

– Small pieces of paper cut in the shape of slices of bread. Then, we had the children write, or write with the assistance of our volunteers, their favorite type of grains.

– Slices of different types of bread in small plastic bags, labeled. And the same slices of bread in plastic bags, numbered on the back. This was our version of a matching game. We instructed the children on matching the slices of bread to its matching mate.

– Small printed pictures of grains and an assortment of other (non-grain) food and/or beverages. Then we grouped the pictures in sets of 3. One picture was a grain and 2 pictures were not grain. Then we instructed the children to identify the grain in the group of pictures. This gave the children product and food identification of grains, hopefully to use later on with their parents in such places like grocery stores.

– Then, for all 3 “Free Play Saturday” events in the month of January, we have a tri-fold poster, made by a graduate student that identifies all three themes (“Crave Your FAV Rainbow”, Feed Your Brain, Go With Grain”, and “Sugar Shockers”)

Undergraduate Interns: Mary Salvatore, Tiffany Mihaliak, Stephanie Thompson, and Danielle McCarthy (left to right)

Undergraduate Interns: Mary Salvatore, Tiffany Mihaliak, Stephanie Thompson, and Danielle McCarthy (left to right)

A game where children could out their favorite grain in the WVU HNF "bread box"

A game where children could write out their favorite grain in the WVU HNF “bread box”

Our grain identification game

Our grain identification game

A game created for children to match the different types of breads to their matching type of bread. The bread on the top was labeled. The bread on the bottom were numbered on the back, so children couldn't identify the correct answers on their own!

A game created for children to match the different types of breads to their matching type of bread. The bread on the top was labeled. The bread on the bottom were numbered on the back, so children couldn’t identify the correct answers on their own!

http://thefunfactory.org/

The ‘Salty Six’?

The “Salty Six”- Which Foods to Avoid?

The “Salty Six”, as the American Heart Association is calling them, are extremely common everyday foods that people do not realize are packed with a high amount of sodium, which severely increases a person’s risk of developing a stroke or heart problems. Now, the AHA is revealing easy ways to lower salt consumption, even on the go. While shopping, consumers can look for the Heart-Check Mark to know which foods have been approved by the AHA as having a healthy amount of sodium.

In the U.S., salt consumption is a major issue. A new study by AHA and ASA revealed that the average American has a daily salt intake level of around 3,400 milligrams, while the recommended amount is 1,500 milligrams. This is mostly due to processed foods and restaurant foods which account for 75% of our salt consumption.

The 6 following foods are the main sources of sodium in society’s diet today:

  • Bread and rolls – Bread is packed with carbs and calories, but according to the new report, it is also high in salt, even though it does not taste salty. One piece of bread can have more than 230 milligrams of sodium, which accounts for 15% of the recommended daily amount.
  • Cold cuts and cured meats – Although cold cuts are normally seen as a healthy way to go, deli meat and pre-packaged turkey can hold up to 1,050 milligrams of sodium, and it is added to most cooked meats to keep them from spoiling.
  • Pizza – Pizza contains fat, calories and cholesterol, but according to the report, it also contains high levels of sodium, around 760 milligrams per slice.
  • Poultry – The common belief is that chicken is not bad for you. However, sodium levels found in poultry are always different, depending on how it is prepared. The best option is to stick with grilled, lean, skinless chicken, even though these kinds still have added sodium.
  • Soup – Although soup is not considered unhealthy, especially because Moms use it as a remedy when children are sick, it can contain up to 940 milligrams per serving.
  • Sandwiches – Whether it be a hamburger, tuna sandwich, or a grilled cheese, the bread of a sandwich and cured meats both contain sodium, and when ketchup or mustard is added to the mix, a sandwich could have as much as 1,500 milligrams of sodium.

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/241365.php

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/252566.php

soup- sodium

salt