Hormone Replacement Therapy Increases Risk For Breast Cancer

A new analysis of data from the Women’s Health Initiative now casts doubt on previous researcher’s findings that taking hormone replacement therapy (HRT) isn’t dangerous. The study, published Friday by the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, concludes that the prognosis for cancers related to hormone replacement therapy is just as dire as for other breast cancers. As a result, women who turn to the treatment are more likely to die of breast cancer than their non-hormone-taking peers.

The principal investigator for the Women’s Health Initiative and lead author of the new study stated, “You could fill a basketball arena with the women who get the disease.” “It seems like you’d want to reach a higher threshold before you take it.”

Nearly 70,000 postmenopausal women participated in randomized clinical trials as part of the Women’s Health Initiative project. The study participants who took estrogen plus progestin had higher rates of breast cancer diagnoses and of breast cancer deaths.

At the same time, more than 90,000 additional women took part in a related observational study that tracked details about their health and hormone use over an average of 11 years. Along with other observational studies, this one found that women who took hormones to treat menopause symptoms and got breast cancer were less likely to die from the illness than women who got breast cancer without taking hormones.

So he and his team identified a subset of more than 41,000 women from the observational study who more closely matched the women who took part in the randomized trial. In doing so, the researchers set aside data on women who were not using hormones when they participated in a study but had taken them in the past — a factor that had the potential to complicate the findings.

The new results fell more closely in line with the findings from the original randomized trial: Survival after breast cancer was similar for both hormone users and non-users. Tumors that arose in women who took hormones were no less deadly.

They had appeared to be, however, because women who had taken hormones years before might have already developed aggressive cancers and would not have been able to participate in the study in the first place.

HRT Study

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Qatar Outdoes America in Obesity Rates?

Well, America isn’t the Only Heavy Hitter Anymore…

The obesity epidemic in America has obviously generated a lot of publicity, in recent years. And more specifically, West Virginia has been in that spotlight with its towering obesity rates, let alone its childhood obesity rates.

But, now Qatar has been given that title of being the most obese country in the world.  According to new data release by the Supreme Council of Health, about 70% of people in Qatar are overweight and some 41% are obese.

If you’ve read my blogs before, I have posted about the Middle East and its urbanization, associated with fast food chains and obesity rates. The rapid urbanization in Qatar, and many other states in the Arab Peninsula, following the discovery of oil has contributed to a sedentary lifestyle. Coupled with a lack of exercise culture and diets high in fats, salts and sugar, obesity has rapidly increased in the Middle East.

The rapid increase in obesity has led to an increase in several non-communicable diseases in the small Gulf country, such as diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and some cancers. According to the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), the rate of diabetes in Qatar has climbed to 20.2% of the population.

Often people think that they need to do a lot to prevent illnesses. That is not the case. Often simply making minimal changes will help. The incidence of these diseases can be significantly reduced by simple lifestyle changes, such as increased regular exercise and integrating healthier foods into your diet.

Just alone is 2012, studies showed that 45% of adult Qataris were obese and up to 40% of school children were obese as well. Many Qataris, especially dietitians, are worried that in the next 5 years that 73% of Qatari women and 69% of Qatari men will be obese. Combined with high rates of diabetes, often triggered by excess weight, this has become a national… Wait, now a global concern for the country. In 2012, 15.4% of adult had diabetes, with rates in children below the age of 5 ay 28.8%.

Qatar surpasses US in obesity

Qatar is World’s Wealthiest and Obese

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Southern Grocery Shopping

Southern Grocery Cart

It’s easy to throw healthy eating habits out the window when you’re away from home and your regular routine. Andrea D’Ambrosio, RD talks about ways to create a healthy winter routine while staying on a budget.

Plan ahead and stick to a list
Being prepared before you grab your grocery cart will help you avoid impulse purchases. It also gives you time to look at flyers, find sales and clip coupons. Try taking advantage of no-name products and avoiding shopping while you’re hungry.

Shop in season and avoid being wasteful
Buy in-season foods from local farmer’s markets, which is cheaper, and be resourceful with leftovers, using up excess food before it goes to waste, she says.

Consider vegetarian alternatives
If you study your grocery bill, meat products are often among the most expensive items. Consider planning meals with vegetarian alternatives like lentils, beans and soy. Check out vegetarian websites for heart- and budget-healthy meal ideas, she suggests.

Here are 5 friendly foods and the reasons you should add them to your grocery list:

  1. Fresh, seasonal fruit: A favorite snack to boost energy levels between meals if you feel a little hungry (power of carbs) and allows you to benefit from vitamins, minerals and antioxidants.
  1. Low-fat (1 percent) or non-fat milk: In order to maintain our bone density, we need to consume adequate dairy to receive calcium, phosphorous, magnesium and protein, which are all essential for bone growth and development.
  1. Whole grains: According to the Journal of Nutrition (2011), oats, barley, rice and quinoa all lower risk of chronic diseases such as coronary heart disease, diabetes and cancer, as well contribute to body-weight management and gastrointestinal health. Try buying whole-grain pasta and remember to look for the words “whole grain” on the label.
  1. Almonds: But just a handful a day, and make them unsalted! A portion-controlled (quarter cup) serving of almonds is excellent for lowering cholesterol because of the unsaturated fats, making them a heart-healthy choice. Almonds are high in vitamin E, a powerful antioxidant, and are naturally high in fiber and a good source of protein!
  1. Edamame: Green soybeans, made popular in Japanese cuisine but available in grocery stores, add a nice nutritional punch. These tasty soybeans can be added as a side dish, steamed in the pod or consumed as a snack or appetizer. Nutritionally speaking, they are another heart-healthy source of protein, fiber and vitamins.

http://www.thestar.com/specialsections/snowbirds/article/1301135–fill-your-southern-grocery-cart-with-healthy-foods

http://www.dieteticdirections.com/

groc shopp

Coffee linked with Cancer

coffee

A new study finds people who drink more than 4 cups of caffeinated coffee a day have half the risk of dying from oral/pharyngeal cancer as people who drink it either occasionally or not at all. However, the researchers say their findings need to be confirmed by more research, and for now should just be received as good news for coffee drinkers and not be used as a reason to recommend everyone should drink 4 cups of coffee a day.

Oral/Pharyngeal Cancer

Oral/pharyngeal or mouth and throat cancer is rarely diagnosed in the early stages because symptoms usually do not appear until the cancer is advanced. Also, the symptoms can be mistaken for something else, such as toothache.

The cancer can sometimes be spotted early during a routine exam by a doctor, dentist, or dental hygienist, and some dentists and doctors suggest you look at your mouth in a mirror at least once a month to check for symptoms.

The most common symptoms are a mouth sore that fails to heal, or a pain in the mouth that doesn’t go away.

The biggest risks for developing oral/pharyngeal cancer are tobacco and alcohol use. Most people who have it are tobacco users.

Researchers Examine Link with Coffee

Previous epidemiological studies have suggested coffee drinking is linked to a reduced risk for mouth and throat cancer.

It has also been suggested that it may not be the caffeine in coffee, but the fact it is rich in antioxidants, polyphenols, and other compounds, that help prevent or slow the development of cancer.

The study gathered a wealth of lifestyle and health information on 968,432 men and women, including their tea and coffee consumption. When they enrolled on the study, none of the participants had cancer, but over the 26 years of follow up, 868 died from oral/pharyngeal cancer.

When they analyzed the tea and coffee consumption in relation to deaths from oral/pharyngeal cancer, the researchers found those participants who reported drinking more than 4 cups of caffeinated coffee a day had a 49% lower risk of death from oral/pharyngeal cancer compared to those who reported not drinking coffee at all or only an occasional cup.

Conclusion and Next Step

The researchers conclude:

“In this large prospective study, caffeinated coffee intake was inversely associated with oral/pharyngeal cancer mortality. Research is needed to elucidate biologic mechanisms whereby coffee might help to protect against these often fatal cancers.”

“We are not recommending people all drink 4 cups of coffee a day. This is just a little bit of good news for those of us who enjoy coffee.”

“There may be some other effects of coffee that may prevent people with certain conditions from drinking a lot of caffeine,” she cautions, noting that:

“This study is about just one cancer site among many. There needs to be much more consistent research before we can support the conclusion that coffee should be consumed for cancer prevention.”

The team is now planning to analyze links between coffee consumption and cancer in a more diverse population.

The Society hopes to recruit at least 300,000 adults from a range of ethnic and racial backgrounds across the US to take part in CPS-3, which aims to increase knowledge of how to prevent cancer.

There has been a lot of debate recently about the benefits and harms of coffee drinking, with more recent news suggesting the benefits probably outweigh the harms.

But researchers spreading the good news are all saying the same thing, as Hildebrand and colleagues themselves point out in this latest study: while there appear to be some health benefits to drinking coffee, there also are a few concerns, and the evidence is not solid enough to actively encourage people to go out and drink coffee.

 

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/253904.php

Prostate Cancer and Diet

Prostate Cancer and The Diet

So, recently one of my Dad’s best friends (which means he’s referred to as an Uncle), was diagnosed with stage 2 Prostate Cancer. So, naturally this was pretty hard news to handle, especially being so close to this family friend. I started looking into more information on the specific cancer and these are some things that I found…

Prostate cancer is a malignant tumor in the prostate, the male gland that produces fluid that makes up part of the semen. The prostate gland is about the size of a walnut. It is attached to the bottom of the bladder and surrounds the urethra. The growth and function of the prostate are controlled by male hormones, like testosterone. Prostate cancer is often slow-growing, and is sometimes present for years before symptoms appear. The five-year survival rate for patients with early diagnosis and treatment is close to 100%.

Prostate Cancer is the most common cancer among men in the United States after skin cancer. More than 200,000 new cases occur annually. It is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in men, after lung cancer. Roughly, 27,000 deaths are attributed to prostate cancer each year.

The cause of Prostate Cancer varies. A man’s age, ethnicity, and family history are all risk factors that cannot be changed. Research is underway to clarify how risk linked to hormone levels, including testosterone and insulin-like growth factor (IGF), may be changeable. Current research suggests that you can reduce your chances of developing prostate cancer by making healthy dietary choices.

Making diet and lifestyle changes can reduce your risk of cancer. Research shows that eating a mostly plant-based diet, maintaining a healthy weight, and getting regular physical activity lowers risk of prostate and other cancers.

Experts suggest that some food choices may be linked to prostate cancer. Foods that probably offer protection against prostate cancer include:

  • Foods containing lycopene, an antioxidant. Lycopene is most commonly found in tomatoes and tomato products, and fruits like red or pink grapefruit, watermelon, and guava.
    • Lycopene supplements don’t necessarily provide the same health protection benefits as lycopene from food.
    • Foods containing selenium. This mineral is plentiful in Brazil nuts, seafood, meat, and poultry.

Foods that are a probable cause of prostate cancer are:

  • Foods high in calcium. However, as the evidence of cancer risk and diets containing cow’s milk, cheese, and other foods high in calcium seems to be in conflict with findings on other types of cancer, there is no recommendation to change how much you consume.