The Big “C” in Food

eggs

People everywhere are looking for easy and affordable ways to add healthy protein to their diet. It seems that eggs appear to be the perfect little protein package. But since the advice from health professionals seems to change often about eggs, consumers are becoming increasingly confused. Healthy consumers really shouldn’t worry about this but, individuals who at-risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) or who have CVD, may want to be aware of this.

What seems to be more important than the food itself is the total cholesterol intake from food. Regardless of where the cholesterol comes from, like eggs or other animal products, consumers who are more susceptible to CVD should keep account of the cholesterol and saturated fat that they are consuming from these food sources.

Remember that eggs are contained in many foods, including bread, cakes, ice cream, muffins and even such entrees as breaded fish, meat dishes and meatloaf. Each of those might add just a fraction of an egg per serving, but together they can increase your cholesterol intake, especially since many of those items contain other ingredients that can be high in cholesterol and saturated fat, such as butter or cream.

Consumers should be careful about not confusing dietary cholesterol with blood cholesterol (LDL, HDL, and triglycerides). The major contributing factor of blood LDL cholesterol is saturated fat. There is a recommendation to limit dietary sources of saturated fat, largely found in dairy and animal protein. Although the saturated fat in eggs is relatively low compared with that in many other animal-based protein sources (one large egg has less than 2g of saturated fat), many of the foods that often accompany eggs (such as bacon, butter, cheese and sausage) are high in saturated fat as well. The combination of foods high in cholesterol, like these, can really add up.

According to the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, cholesterol intake by men averages about 350 mg per day, which exceeds the recommended level of less than 300 mg per day. Average cholesterol intake by women is 240mg per day. Independent of other dietary factors, evidence suggests that one egg (including egg yolk) per day does not result in increased blood cholesterol levels, nor does it increase the risk of cardiovascular disease in healthy people. Consuming less than 300mg per day of cholesterol can help maintain normal blood cholesterol levels. Consuming less than 200mg per day can further help individuals at high risk of cardiovascular disease.

On the plus side, eggs have many nutritional benefits. They’re a good source of high-quality protein, with relatively few calories (6.3 grams of protein for only 72 calories in a large egg). Eggs also contain vitamins B12 and D, and several essential micronutrients, including choline (important for brain health) and lutein (for eye health).

NHANES satd fat

cholesThe Washington Post

Chew Your Soda

Eating Your Words… Literally!

Well, ladies and gentlemen, the world has now seen it all! Edible advertising has entered the already corrupt world of beverage marketing. The Coca-Cola soda brand, Fanta, has recently released a new print advertisement tactic geared towards your taste buds, literally. The soda company has launched, what it claims to be as the first edible print advertisement. The advertisement begins its print with whimsical fonts spelling out alluring and persuading phrases. Then the advertisement invites consumers to physically tear out the page and EAT it. Yes, I said EAT THE PAGE. They do this is consumers can “taste” the flavors for themselves. This type of advertising is really taking amplified reality to a whole different level.

I personally, cannot believe that I have lived to see the day that this is actually happening. I mean, it’s bad enough that there is an epidemic of childhood obesity. So, as a multimillion dollar soda company, I see that Coca-Cola/Fanta is really taking the initiative at combating this problem… By creating an even more open avenue for children at becoming exposed to increased sugar sweetened beverages. Yes why of course- that WOULD make sense (insert sarcasm here).

“Consuming added sugars has been tied to an increased risk for heart disease among adolescents and cholesterol problems”, according to the CDC. More than one-third of American children and adolescents are currently obese. And these numbers are directly related to the over consumption of sugary beverages… like soda! So, instead of creating more avenues of sugar sweetened beverage exposure, especially to child populations, big beverage companies like these should be advocating the opposite. I’ll admit, the marketing tool, itself, is a good idea. But NOT when there are national government agencies attempting to tackle a problem like this. It’s like a slap in the face to America and its youth’s future.

CDC: Kids consume too much sugar

Fanta commercial

The world’s first edible print advertisement

Fanta

Southern Grocery Shopping

Southern Grocery Cart

It’s easy to throw healthy eating habits out the window when you’re away from home and your regular routine. Andrea D’Ambrosio, RD talks about ways to create a healthy winter routine while staying on a budget.

Plan ahead and stick to a list
Being prepared before you grab your grocery cart will help you avoid impulse purchases. It also gives you time to look at flyers, find sales and clip coupons. Try taking advantage of no-name products and avoiding shopping while you’re hungry.

Shop in season and avoid being wasteful
Buy in-season foods from local farmer’s markets, which is cheaper, and be resourceful with leftovers, using up excess food before it goes to waste, she says.

Consider vegetarian alternatives
If you study your grocery bill, meat products are often among the most expensive items. Consider planning meals with vegetarian alternatives like lentils, beans and soy. Check out vegetarian websites for heart- and budget-healthy meal ideas, she suggests.

Here are 5 friendly foods and the reasons you should add them to your grocery list:

  1. Fresh, seasonal fruit: A favorite snack to boost energy levels between meals if you feel a little hungry (power of carbs) and allows you to benefit from vitamins, minerals and antioxidants.
  1. Low-fat (1 percent) or non-fat milk: In order to maintain our bone density, we need to consume adequate dairy to receive calcium, phosphorous, magnesium and protein, which are all essential for bone growth and development.
  1. Whole grains: According to the Journal of Nutrition (2011), oats, barley, rice and quinoa all lower risk of chronic diseases such as coronary heart disease, diabetes and cancer, as well contribute to body-weight management and gastrointestinal health. Try buying whole-grain pasta and remember to look for the words “whole grain” on the label.
  1. Almonds: But just a handful a day, and make them unsalted! A portion-controlled (quarter cup) serving of almonds is excellent for lowering cholesterol because of the unsaturated fats, making them a heart-healthy choice. Almonds are high in vitamin E, a powerful antioxidant, and are naturally high in fiber and a good source of protein!
  1. Edamame: Green soybeans, made popular in Japanese cuisine but available in grocery stores, add a nice nutritional punch. These tasty soybeans can be added as a side dish, steamed in the pod or consumed as a snack or appetizer. Nutritionally speaking, they are another heart-healthy source of protein, fiber and vitamins.

http://www.thestar.com/specialsections/snowbirds/article/1301135–fill-your-southern-grocery-cart-with-healthy-foods

http://www.dieteticdirections.com/

groc shopp

Tigers May Hate Cinnamon But We Don’t

A balanced diet doesn’t have to be bland and boring. Some natural flavors will give your menu a healthy, tasty kick.

What’s In There?: A two-teaspoon serving of cinnamon has 12-15 calories. Cinnamon is a good source of manganese, calcium, iron,  and fiber.

Pros: Cinnamon was long used as a medicine in ancient times because of its anti-clotting and anti-microbial properties. Its scent has also been shown to boost brain function.

Choosing and Storing: You can purchase cinnamon in stick or powder forms. Sticks tend to last longer, but the powder has a stronger flavor. Store cinnamon in cool, dry place. Sticks can be kept for up to one year and powder for six months. Unless you entertain an army of applesauce eaters, stick with smaller quantities.

Using: Start your day off by adding cinnamon to your toast or oatmeal. Or add some spice to a black bean burrito with a dash of cinnamon. Beyond everyone’s favorite toast and pie recipes, cinnamon can be used to kick up your curry or add flavor to black bean burritos.

Synonymous with cold weather treats such as hot apple pie and homemade applesauce, cinnamon’s fame isn’t just for its flavor. The spice’s medicinal qualities have been well-documented. Cinnamon’s essential oils are considered anti-clotting and anti-microbial and shows promise in improving insulin resistance.

Here are 10 health benefits that are associated with cinnamon:

  1. Lower Cholesterol
    Studies have shown that just 1/2 teaspoon of cinnamon per day can lower LDL cholesterol.
  2. Blood Sugar Regulation
    Several studies suggest that cinnamon may have a regulatory effect on blood sugar, making it especially beneficial for people with Type 2 diabetes.
  3. Yeast Infection Help
    In some studies, cinnamon has shown an amazing ability to stop medication-resistant yeast infections.
  4. Cancer Prevention
    In a study published by researchers at the U.S. Department of Agriculture in Maryland, cinnamon reduced the proliferation of leukemia and lymphoma cancer cells.
  5. Anti-Clotting
    It has an anti-clotting effect on the blood.
  6. Arthritis Relief
    In a study at Copenhagen University, patients given half a teaspoon of cinnamon powder combined with one tablespoon of honey every morning before breakfast had significant relief in arthritis pain after one week and could walk without pain within one month.
  7. Anti-Bacterial
    When added to food, it inhibits bacterial growth and food spoilage, making it a natural food preservative.
  8. Brain Health
    One study found that smelling cinnamon boosts cognitive function and memory.
  9. E. Coli Fighter
    Researchers at Kansas State University found that cinnamon fights the E. coli bacteria in unpasteurized juices.
  10. High in Nutrients
    It is a great source of manganese, fiber, iron, and calcium.

    Cinnamon comes in different forms!!