Continuing Professional Education (CPU)

The Commission on Dietetics Registration (CDR) defines continuing professional education (CPE) as education beyond that required for entry into the profession of nutrition and dietetics. CPE participation is mandatory for maintenance of registration. CDR Credentialed Practitioners engage in lifelong development to maintain and improve knowledge and skills for competent practice. This includes continuous self-assessments to identify professional strengths and learning needs, establishment of short-term and long-term goals for individual professional development and selection of appropriate CPE to meet these goals.

Prior approved activities are individual educational activities for which activity Providers have opted to request continuing professional education (CPE) hour approval on behalf of CDR Credentialed Practitioners prior to the date of the activity.

The documentation for review to the CDR or the affiliated dietetic association should be submitted 4-6 weeks prior to the activity date. The CDR requests at least 4-6 weeks for review and asks that the applicant keeps one copy for their file. Some affiliate dietetic associations share the CPE approval responsibilities with the CDR.

Live Activities
The CDR or State CPE Review Contact will send verification of approval. Activity Providers MUST provide each participant with a certificate of completion verifying completion of the activity. Providers MUST also maintain a list of participants who completed their activity for at least 7 years. The approval status can be effective up to one calendar year from date of approval. Approval status will expire after the 1st of the year, and the entire activity along with documentation must be resubmitted for review prior to the expiration date.

The following must be provided with Prior Approval Requests:
– Educational objectives, describing anticipated outcomes for each session
– A Timing outline, detailing all the time spent in sessions, meals, breaks, testing, etc. All hours are awarded for learning time only
– Info regarding the target audience
– Qualifications of speaker(s)/presenter(s).

Self Study Activities
Request for Prior Approval of Self-Study activities must be submitted to the CDR for review. Providers MUST also maintain a list of participants who completed their activity for at least 7 years. The approval status can be effective up to one calendar year from date of approval. Approval status will expire after the third year, and the entire activity along with documentation must be resubmitted for review prior to the expiration date. The CDR’s Competency Assurance Panel has ruled that Self Study CPE activities, regardless of their format, will be eligible for CPE credit for up to 3 years from the date of their initial publication. PDP (Professional Development Portfolio) policy had until recently indicated that Self Study activities which were not “enduring”, like newspapers and recording of live presentations, would be eligible for CPE credit for only 1 year.

The following must be provided with Prior Approval Requests:
– Access to Self Study activities, including objectives of the activity stated in operational behavioral terms
– A bibliography for reference and further reading. Complete references must be cited. Controversial or disputed issues must be presented as such, with documentation from current and reputable refereed scientific journals
– Three letters from content experts. Letters should attest to the CPE content appropriateness for the CDR credentialed practitioners with specific comments. The letters should also attest to the length of time required to complete the activity. The content experts should not be associated with the Provider in any way. A biography, resume, or CV must be included for each content
– Documentation of the background in test item development of the item writers (participation in class, workshops on item writing techniques including sponsoring organization’s name)

As a part of one of my major projects for my currently rotation site, they have asked me to present a CPE presentation/webinar to be streamed to other affiliated hospitals on the FODMAP diet. The FODMAP diet is currently a presentation assignment/project of mine for my Graduate Seminar class this semester. So, hopefully my Seminar presentation, on March 25th, goes well and I can work out any kinks before I plan on presenting at my rotation site facility. So, be on the lookout for a blog about the FODMAP diet!

cdr cpe

todays dietitian

Advertisements

WIC Vouchers at the Farmers Market

As a part of my WIC responsibilities for ISPP dietetic rotations, another intern and I went to assist at the Morgantown Farmers market to distribute WIC vouchers to participants. The farmers’ market vouchers were mentioned to clients at WIC when I observed this past week. So, now I that I could actually see how participants come and use the vouchers, it seems much clearer to me as to how the whole process works.

Each WIC participant in each family gets a total of $20 worth of WIC vouchers to spend at vendors at the farmers’ market that accept WIC vouchers. So, for example if you’re a pregnant mother at WIC with 2 children under 5 years of age, then you would receive $60 worth of vouchers to spend. The vouchers have an expiration date of October 31st, 2013 so; this gives parents and families time to spend the vouchers as well. Each voucher packet has two $5 vouchers inside. So, each participant receives two packets.

The vendors that accept the WIC vouchers have orange posted signs that families can look for when shopping at any of the farmers’ markets. The WIC vouchers themselves are only distributed at the Morgantown Farmers’ Market on Spruce Street, the downtown location.

WIC was given $2,500 worth of vouchers this year. The amount of vouchers that they are given each year depends on their redemption rate from the previous year. So, in 2011 the Monongalia County WIC farmers’ market redemption rate was 60%. In 2012, their redemption rate was 70% when the state redemption rate was 65%. So, from the numbers I observed it seems that if a county has a redemption rate higher than the state average, they receive more vouchers than the previous year and vice versa.

When the WIC participants pick-up their vouchers at the downtown farmers’ market, they can use these vouchers at any of the farmers’ market locations in the area. Yes, the vouchers are only distributed at the Spruce Street location. But, the vouchers can be spent at any farmers’ market listed below. The participants are only given the vouchers once per summer.

The vouchers seem to be a hot commodity as well. Last week was the first week that WIC was at the Morgantown Farmers’ Market to distribute the vouchers. Out of the $2,500 that WIC started with, they issued $1,900 last week. So, today we started with $600 worth of vouchers. They weren’t all given out today but, I can definitely see how WIC participants love using these. Not only does it serve as a convenience but, it also supports the local economy. The program, in a whole, is such a great motivator for WIC participants to increase fresh fruits and vegetables into their family’s diet. The only restriction on what the participants can purchase is that the vouchers will only be accepted for fruits, vegetables, and herbs. So, families can’t purchase things like eggs, proteins, or baked goods. But again, this is great because it encourages families to eat more fruits and vegetables and maybe even try a new fruit or vegetable!

wic fm sign

wic- round right farms

wic fm listt

wic fm list

Fathers Hand- Nutrition Education for Male Mentors and Boys

Basil Boys!

A visual for the guys to pass around to touch, feel, and smell fresh basil!

A visual for the guys to pass around to touch, feel, and smell fresh basil!

WVU’s Human Nutrition and Foods department spearheaded a lesson within the existing program, “Fathers Hand” at the Shack Neighborhood House. For those of you that are unfamiliar with the Shack Neighborhood House, commonly known as the Shack, it is a non-profit community center for the surrounding communities of Morgantown, WV. The Shack runs programs for children, adolescents, teens, and families all year long. Throughout the school year, most programming is run after school and in the evening. In the summer time, programs are run throughout the day, as well as in the evening.

Fathers Hand is an evening program that is designed for male adult mentors and male children. Normally, Fathers Hand every 1st, 2nd, and 4th Thursday of the month from 6pm-8pm. Since April is “Child and Family Awareness Month”, the Shack thought it would be nice to have Fathers Hand every Thursday this month, instead. Fathers Hand is an open program to increase male bonding and expose these men and young men, to anything and everything new that they normally wouldn’t have the opportunity to experience without the help from the Shack.

Well, tonight marked our second lesson and had an emphasis on fruits and vegetables, incorporating the use of container gardens. I developed the lesson plans for the 3 weeks of content for the program, as well as creating handouts, recipes, instructions for activities, and purchased the groceries. Within the lesson, a dinner/meal is included so, we try to always make something for the participants that’s easy to make AND healthy as well. WVU Student Dietetic Association (SDA) volunteers to help cook the meals each lesson. This way, participants are encouraged to try to make these meals outside of the Shack, within their home environment.

Tonight, the lesson consisted of information about how many servings of fruits and vegetables that everyone should be eating. The participants learned the concept of “5-A-Day”, which refers to eating 5 servings of fruits and vegetables each day. The theme of tonight’s lesson was BASIL! The activity was making container basil gardens out of plastic cups. This will serve as a “starter” garden for all the guys, adults included. Both recipes that the participants were served, contained basil and were made with healthy ingredients, which the participants received recipe handouts on as well.

The participants were educated on the MyPlate, using a poster, and focusing on fruits and vegetables. The lesson focused on fruit and vegetable identification, so fresh basil was passed around as a visual for everyone to touch, feel, and smell. The incorporation of fruits and vegetables that were unfamiliar like heirloom tomatoes, fresh basil, avocados, and mangoes was another visual for the participants. The lesson was geared towards green leafy vegetables but, also incorporated “new” and unfamiliar produce which we aim to accomplish overall to teach everyone food identification skills that they could use all year long! 

Shack Neighborhood House

The beginning of the basil, tomato, and zucchini casserole!

The beginning of the basil, tomato, and zucchini casserole!

basil garden1

basil garden

A variety of heirloom tomatoes to show the participants that veggies come in different colors, you wouldn't think of!

A variety of heirloom tomatoes to show the participants that veggies come in different colors, you wouldn’t think of!

heirloom2

heirloom_red

heirloom_lgreenheirloom_yellow

heirloom_green

Is SNAP-Ed Under Attack?

Is the Farm Bill’s Nutrition Education Program under Attack?

farm bill_

Since the Farm Bill is up for re-authorization, Congress is currently threatening to cut one of its components. This component is the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Programs’ nutrition education (SNAP-Ed).

SNAP-Ed empowers recipients to purchase healthy foods within a very tight food budget. The program employs hundreds of RDs in all 50 states. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics’ (AND) Farm Bill Work Group is making slight revisions to the 2012 Farm Bill Recommendation document to highlight the SNAP-Ed program among other aspects of the bill.

The recommendations include talking points related to:

          Empowering consumers

o   Maintain current funding for SNAP Nutrition Education (SNAP Ed), an effective program that empowers participants to change behaviors for healthy eating using knowledge tailored to their lifestyle.

          Provide access to healthy and safe foods

o   Protect and strengthen the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), The Emergency Food Assistance Program (TEFAP) and the Commodity Supplemental Food Program (CSFP), key programs in our nation’s nutrition safety net.

          Assure a healthy and safe food system

o   Ensure funding for a variety of community-based and regional agriculture initiatives that expand the availability of regionally-grown food, create jobs, and promote economic development.

o   Support farm practices and policies that conserve soil, water, air, habitat and biodiversity, as these are essential to our survival, and help to assure that a next generation of farmers has access to land and the skills and incentives to grow healthy foods.

          Assure sound science for future evidenced-based decision making

o   Maintain funding for the National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) and the Agricultural Research Service that includes Human Nutrition Research Centers for vital research to drive better nutrition, eliminate hunger, increase food security and healthy food systems and eliminate diet-related health disparities, including obesity and assure the availability of nutrition monitoring, food composition and related data.

o   Maintain funding for the Specialty Crop Block Grants in order to support food safety and nutrition research and a diversity of fruits, vegetables and nuts available to help people achieve the Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

Farm Bill overview:

The Farm Bill is a critical piece of legislation that determines not only what farmers grow, but what is available in the United States food supply. Farm policies have existed in the U.S. since the establishment of our country. The 1920’s brought about the first big shift in agriculture policies, focusing on direct government intervention to provide income support by increasing crop prices and controlling supplies. Legislation continued to support farmers through direct income payments and crop supply management until 1996. At that time fixed income support payments were removed, making a shift to the modern commodity payments currently in place, and focused on issues surrounding food safety, food assistance and the environment.

The most recent Farm Bill, 2008 Food Conservation and Energy Act, included several key provisions that impacted nutrition.

          – Renamed the “food stamp program” to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), to reflect a modern program, putting healthy foods within reach for people.

          – Authorized a small pilot program, the Healthy Incentives Pilot, to research the effect of incentives in encouraging SNAP participants to purchase healthful foods such as fruits and vegetables.

        –   Created the National Institute for Food and Agriculture (NIFA) to coordinate agricultural research and Extension programs.

          – Established funding for new programs to support producers transitioning to organic agriculture and to increase research in organic agriculture.

So, now the real question is- what will happen next? Only time will tell….

AND Farm Bill

2012 Farm Bill recommendations

farm_bill_icon1

220px-Supplemental_Nutrition_Assistance_Program_logo_svg

Our Healthy Roadtrip Has Begun!

Roadtrippin’ With My Favorite Friends

Yesterday, Monday March 4th, was the launch of this semester’s Shack Neighborhood House nutrition education programming. Every semester and summer, the WVU Didactic Program in Dietetics implements a nutrition education program at the Shack Neighborhood House. The Shack is no stranger to this group of future Dietitians. The two organizations have been collaborating for years now. Over the summer we ran “Carrot Sticks”- a nutrition education program focusing on food culture, smoothies, and fruits/vegetables. In the fall, we ran a program called “Racing the Rainbow”- a nutrition education program that focused on different colors of the rainbow correlating to the different food groups.

All of our programs have a target population of youth, usually between the ages of K-5, or more specifically K-2. I’ve somewhat mastered a system as to how we organize each lesson plan within the programs.

Part 1- Nutrition education

–        MyPlate

–        Focus on a specific type of food (Example- berries, potatoes, avocados, etc.)

–        Focus on the specific benefits of our targeted food of discussion

Part 2- Snack incorporating the food(s) we’ve discussed

–        We make sure that the snack is interactive and they are required to make/build/construct it in an artistic nature

Part 3- Activity

–        We usually find crafts related to our lesson topic

–        I try to make sure that we find activities that the students can cognitively grasp, but also enjoy and learn from as well.

This week, we focused on the region of Oregon. And we discussed the benefits of potatoes but, focused more on the health benefits of berries. The undergraduates used a MyPlate visual as an aid to guide the students in questions, regarding different food groups.

Each week, I will put stickers on the region that we “drove” to on our healthy roadtrip across America.

“Our Healthy Roadtrip” will continue for 5 additional lessons (excluding March 25th because of WVU’s Spring Recess).  I took the liberty at creating a poster of the map of the U.S. to document all the different regions of the country, which the program will touch base on.

Only time will tell, if the Shack’s students start to really get into “Our Healthy Roadtrip” theme this Spring!

Shack Neighborhood House

RT

The location of our new nutrition education curriculum!

The location of “Our Healthy Roadtrip” program!

RTT

A Guatemalan Getaway

A Taste Around the World: A Guatemalan Getaway

So, for the ISPP Dietetic Interns final food culture lesson plan on the semester, we decided to go along with our Guatemalan theme and name our final Taste Around the World: A Guatemalan Getaway. This week, instead of focusing our nutrition education and food culture towards Mexican flavors, we decided to head a little more South.

Our nutrition education component of the program focused on the significance that fiber plays in the role of Guatemalan native’s diets and how it affects their health. We had on display a poster of the Guatemalan food guide compared to the US’s MyPlate. And boy, was there a difference! It was really interesting to see how many participants actually noticed the difference between each country’s food guide and how it impacted our healthy as well.

As the ISPP Dietetic Interns did last time, we developed and hosted this food culture nutrition education program. Not only did we develop and run the entire program, we came prepared this time. With funds from the Student Dietetic Association, we invested in culinary equipment like knives and cutting boards. Me, being the thrifty gal that I am, found a place that sold large amounts of 7 inch Santoku knives and small cutting boards…. The Dollar Tree. Who would’ve thought? After weeks of calling bulk culinary companies, I finally found what we were looking for. This way, participants could have their own “Taste Around the World” kitchen set. And we could add some consistency to the development phases of the program. Overall, I would say the program was another success and I will never forget that good deals can be in the last place you would expect.

Giving everyone a slice at knife skills

Giving everyone a slice at knife skills

Fiber-tastic!

Fiber-tastic!

Guatemalan Hot Chocolate!

Guatemalan Hot Chocolate!

ISPP Dietetic Interns always say "Safety First!"

ISPP Dietetic Interns always say “Safety First!”

Everyone loves vegetables!

Everyone loves vegetables!

So everyone can read our motto in the demo mirror!

So everyone can read our motto in the demo mirror!

Always brushing up on our culinary knife skills!

Always brushing up on our culinary knife skills!

Our salsa station!

Our salsa station!

Our festive table cloth to go with our theme!

Our festive table cloth to go with our theme!

The Baked Tamale Station! Yumm-O

The Baked Tamale Station! Yumm-O

The end product of our tamale adventure!

The end product of our tamale adventure!

The calm before the storm!

The calm before the storm!

ISPP Dietetic Internship

 

Our Healthy Roadtrip

Our Healthy Roadtrip

This past week, I had yet another Extended Community Action Team meeting. Within this meeting, I have 3 undergraduates on my Action Team. They each represent a different aspect of community nutrition off-campus in the Morgantown, WV surrounding area. One of those interns is responsible for community nutrition education at the Shack Neighborhood House. Since we instilled a rainbow nutrition curriculum last semester, I wanted to try something a little different.

I remembered a show that Rachel Ray hosted, where she would travel the country and try different foods and restaurants based on that region and she was on a budget. So, since the ISPP Dietetic Interns most recently were solely responsible for a successful food culture nutrition and culinary education class… I thought this could be like a food culture program but, only within the US. So, out came the new nutrition education curriculum called “Our Healthy Roadtrip”. Each week, for 6 weeks, students from the Human Nutrition & Foods department at West Virginia University will educate children in grades 3-5 on different food culture based on different regions of the country. Then, they will focus on one specific food and have a snack and interactive activity corresponding with the curriculum.  This new program starts on March 4th and will continue until mid-April. I think the students at the Shack Neighborhood House will really get a better sense of the country and what it has to offer, in regards to nutrition and food culture as a whole.

The location of our new nutrition education curriculum!

The location of our new nutrition education curriculum!

A poster I created that will be on display at the SNH for the remainder of the programming!

A poster I created that will be on display at the SNH for the remainder of the programming!

 

Love Your Heart Fun Lunch Set-Up

Love Your Heart (The Before)

I got to sneak a picture of the sign when you enter the 2nd floor of the WVU Heart Institute

I got to sneak a picture of the sign when you enter the 2nd floor of the WVU Heart Institute

On Friday February 1st, the ISPP and GDI Interns were asked to come to the WVU Heart Institute to set up for the upcoming event that was taking place the next day. Elaine Bowen, a WVU Extension Specialist, asked us to attend the “Love Your Heart Fun Lunch” event. This event is a free health screening fair that participants attend, on a first come, first serve basis. The day before the event, volunteers and coordinators took time out of their day to prepare for the health screening extravaganza. Volunteers from the School of Nursing and the School of Pharmacy, from WVU’s Health Sciences campus (HSC), were in attendance at the set up event. It was communicated that we, “nutrition people”, arrive to start help setting up at 5pm on that Friday. Well, since there was only two ISPP Dietetic Interns (including myself) that were going to be responsible for our “Community Nutrition” table, I told Kaylyn (the other ISPP Dietetic Intern) that I would go to the set up event. I did this because there really was no reason to have two people setting up our table. I arrived with my materials, posters, handouts, and other nutrition equipment and waited for instructions, with other students from HSC. To my surprise, when introductions from coordinators started to begin, I was introduced to the whole group of students because I was the only nutrition person who arrived to set up prior to the event. The GDI Interns were administering the screening process (meal planning) of the health fair and the ISPP Interns were responsible for a “Community Nutrition” table in the waiting area for participants to interact with and gain a little more health-related information. Since I was the only nutrition person to attend the event set-up, this gave me a few opportunities to take time to meet everyone that was involved in the planning and organizing of the event. The coordinators provided everyone with an itinerary and a map of the heart screening. The coordinators also shared with the group a Proclamation signed by the Governor of West Virginia, which was my first time seeing anything like that before. Then, the other volunteers were given a tour of each station of the heart screening maze for the next day. Since the ISPP Dietetic Internship table was in the waiting area with other community partners, like the School of Dentistry and EMS, I opted to help others move furniture and carry items inside from coordinator’s cars. I actually ended up getting the ISPP table set up fairly quick so, I helped with anything that anyone needed help with. Overall, I’m glad I came to set up because it made the next morning less stressful for Kaylyn and I. I also had the opportunity to network with other students and faculty in WVU health-related fields.

heart setup_itin

heart setup_itinn

heart setup_itinnn

Starting from the left side of our "community Nutrition" table

Starting from the left side of our “Community Nutrition” table

The middle section of our table- pre-event status

The middle section of our table- pre-event status

And the right side of our table. The only piece to this puzzle that was missing was Kaylyn's "Fast Food Quiz", which she brought the next mooring.

And the right side of our table. The only piece to this puzzle that was missing was Kaylyn’s “Fast Food Quiz”, which she brought the next morning.

A visual I created for participants to realize what the MyPlate actually looks like, compared to an actual oversized plate that most Americans use in their home on a daily rate.

A visual I created for participants to realize what the MyPlate actually looks like, compared to an actual oversized plate that most Americans use in their home on a daily basis.

The volunteer's map of the heart screen- to look over in case participants need help finding stations the next day.

The volunteer’s map of the heart screen- to look over in case participants need help finding stations the next day.

Overall- what the ISPP Dietetic Internship Community Nutrition table looked like the night before the event took place!

Overall- what the ISPP Dietetic Internship Community Nutrition table looked like the night before the event took place!

A Taste Around the World: A Mountaineer Mexican Fiesta

A Taste Around the World: A Mountaineer Mexican Fiesta

ISPP Dietetic Interns made the front page of the DA newspaper!

ISPP Dietetic Interns made the front page of the DA newspaper!

On Wednesday January 30th, 2013, WELLWVU partnered with our Didactic Program in Dietetics at and we launched our first of four healthy food culture cooking classes on campus. This program planning started in the Fall 2012 semester. At that point, the program was initially a graduate student’s responsibility to plan, organize, and delegate but with hiccups in the way- WVU’s ISPP Dietetic Internship came to the rescue!

When we originally found out that Kaylyn Crosier and myself were going to be running the series of education programs that entailed nutrition and culinary skill-building, we though- why not incorporate food culture? Everyone loves learning about different food cultures but, this will make the series even more interesting, with the added culinary and nutrition components.

So, for our launch event- we decided on Mexico as our theme. In fact, A Mountaineer Mexican Fiesta. There was an estimated 25 students who were going to participate. WELLWVU purchased our groceries the day of the event. A created packet was given to each participant.

In each packet consisted:

  • Cover page: menu
  • Hand-washing visual guide
  • A PowerPoint presentation (printed) that Kaylyn created on knife skills
  • Mexican culture and diet handout
  • Nutritional benefits of tomatoes handout
  • Chile pepper handout

The set-up for the event entailed the aid from 2 undergraduate interns from our Human Nutrition & Foods department. We were responsible for setting chairs out for participants, hanging signage for each kitchen unit, setting out all kitchen utensils/tools at each unit, hanging decorations.

I created signs for students to pronounce menu items correctly, the program packets, the food guide pyramid signs, and delivered decorations for the Ag Sciences Annex Test Kitchen. I arrived at the kitchen at 3pm, the program lasted 6pm-8pm, and I eventually exited the kitchen at approximately 9:45pm.

mexico menu

Page 2 in participant's packet

Page 2 in participant’s packet

mexico table

mexico group signs

mexico pepper

Front page article!

Front page article!

mexico article_1

Students were educated on proper knife skills

Students were educated on proper knife skills

Students learned the importance of washing all produce before using in the kitchen...

Students learned the importance of washing all produce before using in the kitchen…

Chiles Rellenos!!

Chiles Rellenos!!

Chilaquiles... Mmmmm

Chilaquiles… Mmmmm

Pico de Gallo!

Pico de Gallo!

Signs were placed near students on cutting board safety

Signs were placed near students on cutting board safety

One of the signs used in our presentation on nutrition. This was utilized/created to increase student's culture awareness and pronunciation.

One of the signs used in our presentation on nutrition. This was utilized/created to increase student’s culture awareness and pronunciation.

The class's cooking experience was complete! Time to eat!! Ole'!!

The class’s cooking experience was complete! Time to eat!! Ole’!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My Mini Kitchen Audit

A Mountaineer Mini Kitchen Audit

So, this past week was quite an eventful one at that for this WVU ISPP Dietetic Intern. I had the pleasure of administering a mini kitchen audit to ensure the WVU Agricultural Sciences Annex Test Kitchen had the tools, equipment, and utensils for an upcoming event that week. Initially, this kitchen audit was intended to be administered by our program’s graduate student, who is a professional chef. But, when the audit was abandoned, I stepped in to do just a brief audit. Our kitchen holds roughly 25 students and has 4 kitchen units. Within each unit, there are 2 sinks, 1 microwave, 1 stove, and holds 4-6 people. Each unit is really broken into 2 stations and has a set amount of kitchen tools within it. In my mini audit, I was just ensuring that we would have enough knives, cutting boards, and utensils to complete a program for that week (which you will read about soon).

The number one concern that I was aware of, when running the mini audit, is that the knives in our kitchen are really dull, which could cause potential serious injury to beginner cooks. I also noticed that there really wasn’t a standard list of equipment in the kitchen, as a whole or at each unit. This could potentially be the reason why kitchens become unorganized at times. Another red flag I observed was the poor quality of a first aid kit that the kitchen had. They kept the kit in a drawer, unorganized, nothing in one container, and I think the components of this “kit” were outdated towards up to 7 years ago. These things are really important when teaching nutrition education in a kitchen setting, especially with students who have never stepped foot in WVU’s Test Kitchen. Hopefully, these problems will be addressed before we run our next programming in the kitchen.

I definitely think that our program should require students to have training of some extent in “how to run a kitchen audit”. I think it would be beneficial for future use and educate students the importance of knowing what’s in your kitchen so, you can identify any gaps or holes for future programming.

http://www.greeneducationfoundation.org/institute/lesson-clearinghouse/396-Kitchen-Audit.html