Renaming the Cuts of Meat…

After 40 years, the names for cuts of meat are being revamped to make it easier for consumers to understand what they’re buying and how to cook it. The labels are shorter and less anatomically based than the names used today for cuts of meats. Pork cuts are now more in sync with the beef cuts consumers are familiar with. The new names and labels should start appearing this summer, just in time for grilling season.

Loin (Pork):

Old

New

Pork Loin Top Loin Chop

Porterhouse Chop

Top Loin Pork Chops

New York Chops

A Pork Loin Rib Chop

Ribeye Chop

Bone-In Pork Loin Chop

T-Bone Chop

Chuck (Beef):

Old

New

Beef Chuck Eye Edge

Pot Roast, Boneless

Denver Roast

Beef Shoulder Top Blade Steak

Boneless Flat Iron

Flat Iron Steak

Sirloin (Beef):

Old

New

Beef Loin Top Sirloin Steak,

Boneless, Cap Off

Top Sirloin Steak

Beef Loin Top Sirloin Cubes

For Kabobs

Kabobs

 

With the new names come new labels for meat. They’ll now identify the species (at this point just beef or pork), whether it’s from the chuck, rib, loin or round, the retail cut name and provide cooking instructions.

The purpose of the naming system is help customers identify cuts with familiar cooking methods. When customers see the word “Porterhouse”, they might think- hey I could put this on the grill…

Most names consumers know and love won’t be changing, but after two years of research it became apparent that Americans needed more clarity when they inspected the meat case, said the director of market intelligence for the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association in Denver.

The new pork names go with a shift in how pork is cooked, compared to the terms used in the 1970’s when these names were first implemented. Because trichinosis is no longer a problem in U.S. hogs, in 2011 the Department of Agriculture changed the recommended cooking temperature for pork from 160 degrees F to 145 degrees F. Once pork could be pink, a pork chop could be cooked just like a steak.

Although the pork producers “love their friends in the beef world” they want to remind grillers that while beef prices are at an all-time high because of the drought and resulting spikes in feed costs, pork is now inexpensive “and will be through summer.”

Chop, Chop! article

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Free Play Saturday 2: CDMWV

Service Learning with the Children’s Discovery Museum of West Virginia

For the second Saturday in the month of January, WVU’s Human Nutrition & Food undergraduates were staffed and participated in an event at the Children’s Discovery Museum of West Virginia, called “Free Play Saturday”. Free Play Saturday consists of 3 events in January, where the undergraduates, ISPP Dietetic Interns, and graduate students have demonstrations, activities, and displays for children and parent participants. The events are taking place the last 3 Saturdays this month and our table have themes for each event. Our three themes consist of:

  1. Crave Your FAV Rainbow
  2. Feed Your Brain, Go With Grain
  3. Sugar Shockers

Experiences like these are ideal service learning opportunities for students at every level. These events give students exposure to children of younger ages and also practice their community nutrition skills, away from campus-aged individuals.

At last Saturday’s event, “Feed Your Brain, Go With Grain”  was the theme. We had different activities for the children participating:

– Small pieces of paper cut in the shape of slices of bread. Then, we had the children write, or write with the assistance of our volunteers, their favorite type of grains.

– Slices of different types of bread in small plastic bags, labeled. And the same slices of bread in plastic bags, numbered on the back. This was our version of a matching game. We instructed the children on matching the slices of bread to its matching mate.

– Small printed pictures of grains and an assortment of other (non-grain) food and/or beverages. Then we grouped the pictures in sets of 3. One picture was a grain and 2 pictures were not grain. Then we instructed the children to identify the grain in the group of pictures. This gave the children product and food identification of grains, hopefully to use later on with their parents in such places like grocery stores.

– Then, for all 3 “Free Play Saturday” events in the month of January, we have a tri-fold poster, made by a graduate student that identifies all three themes (“Crave Your FAV Rainbow”, Feed Your Brain, Go With Grain”, and “Sugar Shockers”)

Undergraduate Interns: Mary Salvatore, Tiffany Mihaliak, Stephanie Thompson, and Danielle McCarthy (left to right)

Undergraduate Interns: Mary Salvatore, Tiffany Mihaliak, Stephanie Thompson, and Danielle McCarthy (left to right)

A game where children could out their favorite grain in the WVU HNF "bread box"

A game where children could write out their favorite grain in the WVU HNF “bread box”

Our grain identification game

Our grain identification game

A game created for children to match the different types of breads to their matching type of bread. The bread on the top was labeled. The bread on the bottom were numbered on the back, so children couldn't identify the correct answers on their own!

A game created for children to match the different types of breads to their matching type of bread. The bread on the top was labeled. The bread on the bottom were numbered on the back, so children couldn’t identify the correct answers on their own!

http://thefunfactory.org/