Management versus Leadership?

leadership-versus-management

Managing in the restaurant industry can be a multi-tasking juggling act at times. Anyone who has ever worked in a restaurant knows that it can be, and most likely is fast-pace and requires organization and communication from everyone in each department.

Management is the ability to plan, organize, direct, staff, control, and evaluate the many functions in a foodservice organization for the purpose of serving organizational goals. A manager’s task is to perform all these functions with the finite supply of resources available. These resources include:

          Labor

          Money

          Products

          Equipment

          Time

          Processes and tools

          Energy

When managing a business like a restaurant, the person in this position could demonstrate different styles of management. There are four common management styles:

          Autocratic: Domineering individual who has ultimate authority over employees

          Bureaucratic: Regular procedures, division of responsibilities, hierarchy, and impersonal relationships

          Democratic: Considering and treating others as equals, more participative in the tasks performed

          Laissez-faire: noninterference, letting people do as they decide

But, being an effective manager does not always mean that makes you an effective leader. The roles are much different. Leadership is the ability to motivate and inspire employees to behave in accordance with the vision of an organization and to accomplish the organization’s goals. Good leaders demonstrate these behaviors:

          Provide direction

o   Leaders communicate clearly and ensure that employees know what is expected of them. One of the ways to accomplish this is to discuss roles and responsibilities with everyone in the operation. This way everyone understands the direction given.

          Lead consistently

o   Using the organization’s mission, vision, and values as checkpoints, leaders maintain standards by holding themselves and other accountable for their actions.

          Influence others

o   Gaining cooperation through caring acts, using persuasion to convince others of appropriate behavior, and offering constructive feedback are ways that leaders influence others. Leaders also examine how to build consensus through a “give” and “take” dialogue as well as encouraging superior performance by relating employees’ actions to the organization’s vision.

          Foster teamwork

o   Leaders create functional work teams that build members’ skills. They also establish cross-functional teams to monitor, standardize, and improve work processes across the company. Assigning problems to temporary groups of selected employees is one way to begin developing these teams.

          Motivate others

o   The importance of communication cannot be overstated. Leaders give pep talks, ask their employees for advice, and vocally praise people’s work. It is also really important to keep employees informed and provide them with a sense of belonging by allowing them to solve problems and contribute ideas.

          Coach and develop employees

o   Leaders instruct employees on better ways to perform a task, offer insights to high-potential workers, and ensure that every employee has a development plan. They also seek out learning opportunities for the staff and encourage them to enroll in these programs.

          Champion change

o   Anticipating the need for change, looking for better ways to do things, understanding the link between change and learning, and communicating the benefits of new processes and procedures are all actions of a leader.

So, overall here are the differences you will want to remember:

          Manager:

o   Plans and budgets

o   Oversees staffing

o   Solves problems

o   Maintains order

o   Write reports and other types of materials

          Leader:

o   Charts a course that provides direction

o   Offers guidance and counsel

o   Motivates and inspires a call to action

o   Creates an environment for change

o   Trains and teaches

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Promoting the Hospitality AND Dietetic Internship Experience

Check out how WVU’s College of Business & Economics has showcased their restaurant and their interns (including 2 graduate students that happen to be ISPP dietetic interns!)

WVU Today Hospitality Press Release 

Food Allergens and Restaurants

Restaurant Owners and Food Allergies

Chef Ming Tsai remembers ordering a sandwich without bread for his then-3-year-old son David because the toddler was allergic to seven of the eight most common food allergens. Tsai approached the restaurant manager, a man in a suit and tie standing off to the side.

“He just looked at me and said, ‘We’d rather not serve him,'” Tsai said, adding that waiters and restaurant managers used to roll their eyes when he mentioned David’s food allergies. “Don’t open a restaurant if you don’t know what’s in your food. This is absurd.”

From that day on, Tsai made it his mission to promote allergy awareness. He developed an allergy safety system in his restaurant, Blue Ginger in Wellesley, Mass. He became the spokesman for the nonprofit Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Network (FARE). He worked with the Massachusetts state legislature for five years on an allergy safety bill.

David went into anaphylactic shock during Tsai’s father-in-law’s 70th birthday, Tsai said. He was in the kitchen preparing roast tenderloin for 80 guests when the babysitter accidentally gave 5-year-old David whole milk instead of rice milk.

“David comes down and says, ‘My throat is itchy, and it’s tightening up,'” Tsai said. “You could tell in his eyes that he’s not overreacting here.”

David’s breathing became labored, and Tsai’s wife, a nurse, sprang to action and jammed an EpiPen in David’s leg.

“That was the most horrible scream I ever heard in my life,” he said. “My body still tingles from that scream.”

“My first reaction was that’s a really unfunny joke from upstairs,” he said. “I couldn’t wait to cook for my kid. That was my dream.”

Eggs, fish, milk, peanuts, shellfish, soy, tree nuts, and wheat make up 90 percent of food allergies, according to a 2008 CDC report that found an 18 percent rise in children diagnosed with food allergies between 1997 and 2007.

As David grew up, Tsai said it was especially hard to visit restaurants, something he loved to do as a kid. As allergies and allergy awareness have become more prevalent, he said people’s attitudes have shifted. He usually serves between 6 and 10 tables a night with some kind of food allergy, and he’s happy to do it.

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As you can tell by the story of Chef Tsai, food allergies have become all too common in society today. With the increase in food allergies among people, especially in children, parents are becoming more educated and becoming proactive on the issue at hand. People like Chef Tsai are even becoming advocates for food allergies. This being said, this is why Chef Tsai put a solid effort into becoming an advocate for food allergies and pushed for this bill to be passed.

http://www.mass.gov/legis/bills/senate/185/st02/st02701.htm

This is why, in my opinion, more restaurants in America should take a role in nutrition education. If more restaurants would identify food allergens on their menus, both in-house and out-of-house, this could potentially save children from hospitals visits, parents from stress and worry, and healthcare costs across the country.

This being said, the WVU Human Nutrition & Foods is currently working on a food allergens project with a restaurant in the Morgantown, WV area. We were approached by the restaurant, Taziki’s Mediterranean Café, to identify their food allergens on their menu. The restaurant is owned and operated by the College of Business and Economics at WVU and was donated by a B&E alumni who not only promotes entrepreneurship but, also promotes fresh hospitality. This alumni’s company, called Fresh Hospitality, is joining the HN&F department and proactively making positive changes to address food allergens.

http://www.freshhospitality.net/

Hopefully, other restaurants and chains will see companies like Fresh Hospitality, making conscious efforts on their menus to address nutrition issues, like food allergies, and make changes themselves. When other restaurants begin to catch on to these healthy trends that the rest of American restaurants are beginning to adopt, WVU’s HN&F department will be here to help out every way we can!

http://www.foodallergy.org/section/about

http://community.kidswithfoodallergies.org/

http://www.foodallergy.org/files/WVGuidelines.pdf

http://wvde.state.wv.us/nutrition/calculator.html

http://abcnews.go.com/Health/food-allergy-awareness-chef-ming-tsai-inspired-son/story?id=17879455#.UMEqi4bJpqQ

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