Setting Goals with Your Team!

No matter what stage of development your team may be at, they’re most effective when the whole group understands and accepts the goals of their assignment. A way to get your team on-board is to allow members to provide feedback on defining and refining project goals. Managers should also provide feedback on establishing and refining these goals. Synergy between team members and managers in establishing project statements will result in achieving these goals, as well. This conversation should normally happen at the initial project meeting, which should also describe team-building goals and information goals.

Effective teams contribute to the achievement of three types of goals throughout the course of a project.

1.      Team-building goals focus on:

          Getting to know each team member. Teams are most effective when they take time to discover each member’s background, skill, work style, etc.

          Learning to work together. Teams need to identify the strengths of each member and set processes in place to work efficiently together.

          Setting ground rules. Members need a common understanding of how the team will conduct itself and what is acceptable and unacceptable behavior. Some of the topics for discussion are meeting attendance, promptness, conversational courtesy, assignments, and breaks.

          Figuring out decision-making processes. A characteristic of ineffective teams is that decisions just seem to happen. Teams need to discuss how decisions will be made to avoid conflicts in the future.

2.      Information goals include:

          Getting updates from team members on progress! Staying connected with your team and making sure everyone is on the same page is important.

          Learning about the tools used to support the team’s various tasks.

          Communicating with stakeholders.

3.      Project goals focus on:

          Understanding the project and each member’s assignment. Teams should be able to ask questions about their tasks and the stakeholders’ expectations.

          Identifying the business needs supported by the goals.

          Understanding the process that will be used. Not only do team members need to understand the overall process, but they also need to understand which steps are their responsibilities.

          Identifying the resources needed. Team members need to discuss resources that might be needed sooner than later in the process. This discussion ensures that necessary resources will be available at their designated times.

          Developing a project plan or outline of how the team will accomplish their goals. Teams need roadmaps. A team leader should discuss the logistics of the project with team members. Breaking the process into smaller steps and assigning duties will help build team collaboration. Team should continue to review and revise these plans as they move toward reaching their goals.

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Management versus Leadership?

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Managing in the restaurant industry can be a multi-tasking juggling act at times. Anyone who has ever worked in a restaurant knows that it can be, and most likely is fast-pace and requires organization and communication from everyone in each department.

Management is the ability to plan, organize, direct, staff, control, and evaluate the many functions in a foodservice organization for the purpose of serving organizational goals. A manager’s task is to perform all these functions with the finite supply of resources available. These resources include:

          Labor

          Money

          Products

          Equipment

          Time

          Processes and tools

          Energy

When managing a business like a restaurant, the person in this position could demonstrate different styles of management. There are four common management styles:

          Autocratic: Domineering individual who has ultimate authority over employees

          Bureaucratic: Regular procedures, division of responsibilities, hierarchy, and impersonal relationships

          Democratic: Considering and treating others as equals, more participative in the tasks performed

          Laissez-faire: noninterference, letting people do as they decide

But, being an effective manager does not always mean that makes you an effective leader. The roles are much different. Leadership is the ability to motivate and inspire employees to behave in accordance with the vision of an organization and to accomplish the organization’s goals. Good leaders demonstrate these behaviors:

          Provide direction

o   Leaders communicate clearly and ensure that employees know what is expected of them. One of the ways to accomplish this is to discuss roles and responsibilities with everyone in the operation. This way everyone understands the direction given.

          Lead consistently

o   Using the organization’s mission, vision, and values as checkpoints, leaders maintain standards by holding themselves and other accountable for their actions.

          Influence others

o   Gaining cooperation through caring acts, using persuasion to convince others of appropriate behavior, and offering constructive feedback are ways that leaders influence others. Leaders also examine how to build consensus through a “give” and “take” dialogue as well as encouraging superior performance by relating employees’ actions to the organization’s vision.

          Foster teamwork

o   Leaders create functional work teams that build members’ skills. They also establish cross-functional teams to monitor, standardize, and improve work processes across the company. Assigning problems to temporary groups of selected employees is one way to begin developing these teams.

          Motivate others

o   The importance of communication cannot be overstated. Leaders give pep talks, ask their employees for advice, and vocally praise people’s work. It is also really important to keep employees informed and provide them with a sense of belonging by allowing them to solve problems and contribute ideas.

          Coach and develop employees

o   Leaders instruct employees on better ways to perform a task, offer insights to high-potential workers, and ensure that every employee has a development plan. They also seek out learning opportunities for the staff and encourage them to enroll in these programs.

          Champion change

o   Anticipating the need for change, looking for better ways to do things, understanding the link between change and learning, and communicating the benefits of new processes and procedures are all actions of a leader.

So, overall here are the differences you will want to remember:

          Manager:

o   Plans and budgets

o   Oversees staffing

o   Solves problems

o   Maintains order

o   Write reports and other types of materials

          Leader:

o   Charts a course that provides direction

o   Offers guidance and counsel

o   Motivates and inspires a call to action

o   Creates an environment for change

o   Trains and teaches

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