The Summer of Institutional Food Service, Production, and Management Rotation Begins!

Well this week marked the kick off to my summer of my Institutional Food Service, Production, and Management rotation within WVU’s ISPP dietetic internship. Within this rotation, I am required to have a minimum of 240 hours of experience in a food service production system. Along with these hours, I have a set of objectives to complete as well.

Since Taziki’s Mediterranean Café has partnered with our Didactic Program in Dietetics (DPD), I will be doing my rotation at WVU’s downtown campus’s Mountainlair location. The rotation is also attached to a class affiliated with the College of Business and Economics at WVU as well. So, not only are there other nutrition students working alongside me this summer, but there are business students registered for this class as well.

As a part of my rotation objectives, I will complete 2 major projects:

          The Theme Meal Project

          The Management Quality and Process/Performance Improvement Project

This rotation is broken down into 4 sections:

          Section 1: Storeroom, Safety, and Catering

          Section 2: Retail/Dining Room

          Section 3: Menu and Theme Meal Project

          Section 4: Culminating Experience: The Management Quality and Process/Performance Improvement Project

As outlined in my syllabus for the business class attached to the rotation through Taziki’s Mediterranean Café, Graduate students are required to:

          Hold a cumulative ServSafe review session for the undergraduates enrolled in the class on July 30th.

          Develop a marketing campaign to improve breakfast sales with the undergraduates in my group. (I’m the only Graduate student in my group). This will require me speaking to the General Managers about breakfast sales in the restaurant and apply this information to my Management Quality and Process/Performance Improvement Project.

          Develop a FOG BMP Report. This specific report is focusing on sustainability. The report will identify fats, oils, and grease best management practices for Taziki’s AND Martin’s BBQ Joint.

          Then, our last project will be split into 2 parts: the Food Systems Project: I’ll work to raise consumer awareness on the need to support local farmers and food.

o   Farmers’ Market Theme Meal

§  This will utilize the Morgantown Farmers’ Market

o   Management Quality and Process/Performance Improvement Project

§  This will focus on the proposal to use local animal proteins that can be used at Taziki’s and Martin’s BBQ Joint

Only time will tell how my rotation progresses!

Taziki’s Named Best On-Campus Food at WVU

Here is a picture of someone standing in front of my assigned station for the week!

Here is a picture of someone standing in front of my assigned station for the week!

A Taste Around the World: A Mountaineer Mexican Fiesta

A Taste Around the World: A Mountaineer Mexican Fiesta

ISPP Dietetic Interns made the front page of the DA newspaper!

ISPP Dietetic Interns made the front page of the DA newspaper!

On Wednesday January 30th, 2013, WELLWVU partnered with our Didactic Program in Dietetics at and we launched our first of four healthy food culture cooking classes on campus. This program planning started in the Fall 2012 semester. At that point, the program was initially a graduate student’s responsibility to plan, organize, and delegate but with hiccups in the way- WVU’s ISPP Dietetic Internship came to the rescue!

When we originally found out that Kaylyn Crosier and myself were going to be running the series of education programs that entailed nutrition and culinary skill-building, we though- why not incorporate food culture? Everyone loves learning about different food cultures but, this will make the series even more interesting, with the added culinary and nutrition components.

So, for our launch event- we decided on Mexico as our theme. In fact, A Mountaineer Mexican Fiesta. There was an estimated 25 students who were going to participate. WELLWVU purchased our groceries the day of the event. A created packet was given to each participant.

In each packet consisted:

  • Cover page: menu
  • Hand-washing visual guide
  • A PowerPoint presentation (printed) that Kaylyn created on knife skills
  • Mexican culture and diet handout
  • Nutritional benefits of tomatoes handout
  • Chile pepper handout

The set-up for the event entailed the aid from 2 undergraduate interns from our Human Nutrition & Foods department. We were responsible for setting chairs out for participants, hanging signage for each kitchen unit, setting out all kitchen utensils/tools at each unit, hanging decorations.

I created signs for students to pronounce menu items correctly, the program packets, the food guide pyramid signs, and delivered decorations for the Ag Sciences Annex Test Kitchen. I arrived at the kitchen at 3pm, the program lasted 6pm-8pm, and I eventually exited the kitchen at approximately 9:45pm.

mexico menu

Page 2 in participant's packet

Page 2 in participant’s packet

mexico table

mexico group signs

mexico pepper

Front page article!

Front page article!

mexico article_1

Students were educated on proper knife skills

Students were educated on proper knife skills

Students learned the importance of washing all produce before using in the kitchen...

Students learned the importance of washing all produce before using in the kitchen…

Chiles Rellenos!!

Chiles Rellenos!!

Chilaquiles... Mmmmm

Chilaquiles… Mmmmm

Pico de Gallo!

Pico de Gallo!

Signs were placed near students on cutting board safety

Signs were placed near students on cutting board safety

One of the signs used in our presentation on nutrition. This was utilized/created to increase student's culture awareness and pronunciation.

One of the signs used in our presentation on nutrition. This was utilized/created to increase student’s culture awareness and pronunciation.

The class's cooking experience was complete! Time to eat!! Ole'!!

The class’s cooking experience was complete! Time to eat!! Ole’!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My Mini Kitchen Audit

A Mountaineer Mini Kitchen Audit

So, this past week was quite an eventful one at that for this WVU ISPP Dietetic Intern. I had the pleasure of administering a mini kitchen audit to ensure the WVU Agricultural Sciences Annex Test Kitchen had the tools, equipment, and utensils for an upcoming event that week. Initially, this kitchen audit was intended to be administered by our program’s graduate student, who is a professional chef. But, when the audit was abandoned, I stepped in to do just a brief audit. Our kitchen holds roughly 25 students and has 4 kitchen units. Within each unit, there are 2 sinks, 1 microwave, 1 stove, and holds 4-6 people. Each unit is really broken into 2 stations and has a set amount of kitchen tools within it. In my mini audit, I was just ensuring that we would have enough knives, cutting boards, and utensils to complete a program for that week (which you will read about soon).

The number one concern that I was aware of, when running the mini audit, is that the knives in our kitchen are really dull, which could cause potential serious injury to beginner cooks. I also noticed that there really wasn’t a standard list of equipment in the kitchen, as a whole or at each unit. This could potentially be the reason why kitchens become unorganized at times. Another red flag I observed was the poor quality of a first aid kit that the kitchen had. They kept the kit in a drawer, unorganized, nothing in one container, and I think the components of this “kit” were outdated towards up to 7 years ago. These things are really important when teaching nutrition education in a kitchen setting, especially with students who have never stepped foot in WVU’s Test Kitchen. Hopefully, these problems will be addressed before we run our next programming in the kitchen.

I definitely think that our program should require students to have training of some extent in “how to run a kitchen audit”. I think it would be beneficial for future use and educate students the importance of knowing what’s in your kitchen so, you can identify any gaps or holes for future programming.

http://www.greeneducationfoundation.org/institute/lesson-clearinghouse/396-Kitchen-Audit.html

The Never-Ending Week of Nutrition

What a week I have had! Let’s map this week out thus far…

Monday

  • WVU Agricultural Sciences Annex Test Kitchen audit 4pm-6:30pm; 7:30pm-9pm
  • Student Dietetic Association meeting 6:30pm

Tuesday

  • ISPP Action Team Undergraduate Intern meeting 6:30pm
  • Action For Healthy Kids
  • Shack Neighborhood House
  • Children’s Discovery Museum of WV
  • Davis College of Agriculture, Natural Resources, and Design

Wednesday

  • A Taste Around the World: “A Mountaineer Mexican Fiesta”
  • A program educating students on campus (undergraduates/graduates) about food culture awareness, nutrition education, and culinary skill-building.
  • Located at the Ag Sciences Annex Test Kitchen 6pm-8pm

Thursday

  • Organized information and recruitment for an event that the WVU School of Pharmacy invited us to.
  • The information was presented to the West Virginia Grief Center.
  • Thursday Jan 31st 5:45pm; Present information at approximately 6:15pm

Friday

  • Women Love Your Heart Health Screening set-up
  • Friday Feb. 1st 5pm

Saturday

  • Women Love Your Heart Health Screening main event
  • Saturday Feb. 2nd 7:30am-2pm

 

So, stay tuned ladies and gentleman… You’ll be reading some very interesting community nutrition blogs within the next few days!

Free Play Saturday 2: CDMWV

Service Learning with the Children’s Discovery Museum of West Virginia

For the second Saturday in the month of January, WVU’s Human Nutrition & Food undergraduates were staffed and participated in an event at the Children’s Discovery Museum of West Virginia, called “Free Play Saturday”. Free Play Saturday consists of 3 events in January, where the undergraduates, ISPP Dietetic Interns, and graduate students have demonstrations, activities, and displays for children and parent participants. The events are taking place the last 3 Saturdays this month and our table have themes for each event. Our three themes consist of:

  1. Crave Your FAV Rainbow
  2. Feed Your Brain, Go With Grain
  3. Sugar Shockers

Experiences like these are ideal service learning opportunities for students at every level. These events give students exposure to children of younger ages and also practice their community nutrition skills, away from campus-aged individuals.

At last Saturday’s event, “Feed Your Brain, Go With Grain”  was the theme. We had different activities for the children participating:

– Small pieces of paper cut in the shape of slices of bread. Then, we had the children write, or write with the assistance of our volunteers, their favorite type of grains.

– Slices of different types of bread in small plastic bags, labeled. And the same slices of bread in plastic bags, numbered on the back. This was our version of a matching game. We instructed the children on matching the slices of bread to its matching mate.

– Small printed pictures of grains and an assortment of other (non-grain) food and/or beverages. Then we grouped the pictures in sets of 3. One picture was a grain and 2 pictures were not grain. Then we instructed the children to identify the grain in the group of pictures. This gave the children product and food identification of grains, hopefully to use later on with their parents in such places like grocery stores.

– Then, for all 3 “Free Play Saturday” events in the month of January, we have a tri-fold poster, made by a graduate student that identifies all three themes (“Crave Your FAV Rainbow”, Feed Your Brain, Go With Grain”, and “Sugar Shockers”)

Undergraduate Interns: Mary Salvatore, Tiffany Mihaliak, Stephanie Thompson, and Danielle McCarthy (left to right)

Undergraduate Interns: Mary Salvatore, Tiffany Mihaliak, Stephanie Thompson, and Danielle McCarthy (left to right)

A game where children could out their favorite grain in the WVU HNF "bread box"

A game where children could write out their favorite grain in the WVU HNF “bread box”

Our grain identification game

Our grain identification game

A game created for children to match the different types of breads to their matching type of bread. The bread on the top was labeled. The bread on the bottom were numbered on the back, so children couldn't identify the correct answers on their own!

A game created for children to match the different types of breads to their matching type of bread. The bread on the top was labeled. The bread on the bottom were numbered on the back, so children couldn’t identify the correct answers on their own!

http://thefunfactory.org/