What Does “Team Growth” Mean to You?

A team, especially one that is in a foodservice operation, has four distinct stages of group development. The four stages of group development were created by Dr. Bruce W. Tuckerman after observation of the different phases in the development and maturity of groups of people.

Forming

The first stage is forming. This is where teams are getting to know each other, as well as learning what will be required of them in order to achieve their assigned goal. This stage is defined by the way the team members approach each other and inspect the limitations of group behavior. The group is also evaluating the manager’s role and leadership. Throughout this stage, the manager takes a larger role in directing the progress of the team. Directing involves telling the group what specifically needs to be accomplished, establishing guidelines, and providing specifics on the five Ws (Who, What, Where, When, Why) and How. At this point, the team members are focusing on being part of a team.

Team Feeling:

          Excitement; Optimism; Pride in being selected; Wondering what role and influence they will have; Anxiety; Questioning why they and other team members were selected

Team Behavior:

          Friendly; Agreeable; Deciding how to accomplish tasks; Determining acceptable team behavior; Information gathering; Handling complaints about the organization; Discussing barriers to the task

Leadership Style:

          Directing

Storming

The second stage is storming. At this point, the reality of the project sets in for the team and various interpersonal struggles begin to surface. Typically, this is the most difficult stage for any team to get through, since power clashes and competition between team members are common and are easily seen here. Besides this realization, team members become impatient with their lack of progress and rely more on individual approaches instead of teamwork. At this time, the manager needs to utilize a coaching style to clarify and explain tasks repeatedly. The manager will need to persuade team members often to work together and refocus their efforts.

            Team Feeling:

          Resistance to approaches different from what the team is comfortable with; Swings in attitudes about the team and project; Questioning many aspects of the task

Team Behavior:

          Arguing; Choosing sides; Perceived “pecking order”; Increased tension; Jealousy; Power struggles; Lack of progress; Loss of interest

Leadership Style:

           Coaching

Norming

The third stage, norming, sees team member settling their differences and developing more cohesive and trusting relationships. The team realizes that they can work together and help each other achieve success. The members understand the team’s needs and accept the team ground rules and the roles that each person plays in achieving the project goals. Conflict decreases as these realizations occur and team members develop more confidence in their ability to work together and accomplish the task. At this time, the manager transitions into a leadership style of supporting the team by providing encouragement, listening more than telling, and promoting team discussions.

            Team Feeling:

          Expressing constructive criticism; Membership acceptance; Relief that things are finally going smoothly; Understanding own contribution; Acceptance of membership

Team Behavior:

          Attempts for harmony; Avoiding conflict; Discussing team dynamics; Sense of common purpose; Establishing and monitoring team rules; Expressing ideas

Leadership Style:

          Supporting

 

Performing

At last but not least, the fourth and final stage is performing. This is where team interdependence is recognized. Team members can analyze and solve problems successfully together. They have accepted each other’s strengths and weaknesses and can adapt to meet the needs of each member. The team becomes very productive and truly adds value to the organizations. At this point, the manager can use a delegating style. The manager no longer needs to provide much direction and can periodically monitor the team’s progress with update meetings.

            Team Feeling:

          Insights into group processes; Understanding of each member’s strengths and weaknesses; Satisfaction with progress; Trusting; Friendly; Having fun

Team Behavior:

          Individual behavior modification; Working through team problems; Close attachment to members; Flexibility; Humor; Ownership of results

Leadership Style:

          Delegating

team growth

team grow

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April is National Preceptor Month!

April is National Preceptor Month!

As an essential component of any dietetic internship, preceptors play an important role in the lives of dietetic intern students everywhere. Within each rotation of a dietetic internship, there exists a preceptor that decides to take on the role of a mentor and personally teach their intern(s) the specialty skills for that specific rotation.

Starting in the month of April, the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (AND) and the Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics (ACEND) will celebrate National Preceptor Month by beginning a preceptor drive!

ACEND will unveil a database which allows practitioners to register to potentially become preceptors and join the effort to guide and educate the next generation of dietetic professionals. In addition, the Academy and ACEND will establish a Find-a-Preceptor Database so directors and students members of the Academy can search for a preceptor within a certain geographical or specialty area.

Applications and efforts, like the preceptor database, are so important in the field of nutrition, as well as the profession. It’s important for other RDs to promote the growth of tomorrow’s RDs, to try and keep America healthy!

Become a Preceptor!

preceptor

 

ACEND

 

Leadership in Community Wellness: Undergraduates Action Team Meeting

Community Nutrition Action Team Engage!

As an ISPP Dietetic Intern, we have an emphasis area of “Leadership in Community Wellness”. Therefore, each intern is assigned an Action Team based on an area of “LCW” that we are most associated with. I am the ISPP Dietetic Intern responsible for the Extended Community Wellness Action Team. This team is comprised of WVU Human Nutrition & Foods students that applied for positions as Undergraduate Interns (HN&F 495 Independent Study credit).

The first Extended Community Undergraduate Intern Action Team meeting took place this week on Tuesday January 29th. On the action team, I have an undergraduate intern for (1) WV Action For Healthy Kids, (1) Children’s Discovery Museum of West Virginia, and (1) The Shack Neighborhood House and Davis College of Agriculture, Natural Resources, and Design. Bringing my team to a total of 3 students. In our meeting, I distributed tables of meetings, projects, programs, and presentations that each undergrad intern will be responsible for throughout the semester. I distributed all 4 tables to each student on my action team so, everyone knows what everyone else is doing and playing a role in. I think this will help prevent any confusion as to what each undergrad intern’s role will be throughout the semester.

As a team, I expect all 3 students to attend all Action Team meetings, as well as keeping notes of every meeting and emailing these notes to me by the Sunday after our meeting. This way I can see if the students understand their role on the Extended Community Wellness Action Team and if anything needs to be clarified at the next meeting. Currently, I have told this Action Team that our focus is to get “The Casserole Club” organized and lessons start being developed. At the end of the semester, I expect a PowerPoint presentation of what everyone completed throughout the semester. This presentation may OR may not be a group presentation, depending if our final meeting is concurrent with the other Action Teams (Collegiate, Worksite, Social Media).

AFHK Undergraduate Intern

  • Current involvement
    • Newsletter
    • Facebook page- keep a documented file of all your posts
    • Grant workshop
      • Document all meeting notes about workshop
      • Save and email all supplemental materials from workshop
  • Meetings
    • Document all meetings attended and submit
    • WV AFHK chapter meetings
    • SWAB meetings
  • Semester project
    • Create a nutrition education program based on an AFHK theme/idea
      • This theme does not have to be Smarter Lunchrooms
      • This project can be utilized within the Community Undergraduate Internship Action Team
        • Can work with SNH or CDM of WV to utilize child/adolescent populated organizations
      • BE CREATIVE!!
  • Compose a 1 page (maximum) article based on a topic given by Community ISPP Dietetic Intern
    • Post article on AFHK Facebook page
    • Submit on Ecampus by deadline
    • These topics that will be assigned by Intern, will be based on your AFHK project

Children’s Discovery Museum of WV

  • Timeline of all CDMWV events for entire semester
    • Nutrition and non-nutrition related
    • Due: February17th, 2013
    • Meetings
      • Schedule regular meetings with Katie Bulian
      • Projects
        • Develop a strategic plan for CDMWV’s Facebook page
          • Post pictures on their page
          • Tag them in articles posted
          • Create publicity for the CDMWV through Facebook applications
          • Document all Facebook activity with CDMWV
  • Healthy Passport” nutrition programming

 

Davis College of Agriculture, Natural Resources, and Design

  • Meetings
    • Oxfam Hunger Banquet: Mountaineering Against Hunger  planning meetings
    • Food Day/Week planning meetings
    • Projects
      • Oxfam Hunger Banquet: “Mountaineering Against Hunger
        • Instructions outlined in binder and table
        • Decided to schedule event on a Saturday
        • Committees: (1) Publicity, (2) Logistics, and (3) Planning
        • Find a venue
        • Set a date- late semester event (nice weather)
        • Food Day/Week
          • Different from National Food Day (normally held in October)
          • Plan event near/around Oxfam Hunger Banquet
          • Ideas: Plan Food Day/Week building up to Oxfam Hunger Banquet (Saturday)
          • Collaborate with cross-campus organizations involvement
          • Find venue(s)
          • Set a date(s)- late semester (nice weather, possibly outside events?)

Shack Neighborhood House

  • “Happy School”- A program for new, young parents with young children that meet Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday 9:30am-12pm. So, our program would either take place Tuesday or Thursday 10am-11am OR 11am-12pm.
    • The Casserole Club
      • Focusing on food culture
      • 8 week program
      • Supply recipes from http://recipefinder.nal.usda.gov/
      • Meetings
        • Attend a min. of 1 United Way meeting
          • ISPP Dietetic Intern will determine a calendar of meetings in the Morgantown area
          • Projects
            • After-school programming
              • Brainstorming with Lauren Gerchufsky to work with AFHK on program ideas
              • 8 week program
                • Monday afternoons are still available at the SNH, as they were in the Fall 2012 semester
  • Family Fun Night
    • Every third Tuesday and Thursday of the month 6pm-8pm
  • Father’s HAND
    • Every Thursday 6pm-8pm
    • Prefers to have male HNF student to present
    • Interested in cooking classes
  • Rosenbaum House
    • SNH recently just received a small grant that they plan on using towards preparing easy, healthy recipes and delivering/serving clients. They are interested in having HNF students help.
    • Jess is waiting to find out more information about the process

     

http://www.the-shack.org/

http://thefunfactory.org/

http://www.pierpont.edu/schoolofhumanservices/wv-child-nutrition-center/west-virginia-action-healthy-kids

CDM

 

 

Oxfam

SNH

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