Management versus Leadership?

leadership-versus-management

Managing in the restaurant industry can be a multi-tasking juggling act at times. Anyone who has ever worked in a restaurant knows that it can be, and most likely is fast-pace and requires organization and communication from everyone in each department.

Management is the ability to plan, organize, direct, staff, control, and evaluate the many functions in a foodservice organization for the purpose of serving organizational goals. A manager’s task is to perform all these functions with the finite supply of resources available. These resources include:

          Labor

          Money

          Products

          Equipment

          Time

          Processes and tools

          Energy

When managing a business like a restaurant, the person in this position could demonstrate different styles of management. There are four common management styles:

          Autocratic: Domineering individual who has ultimate authority over employees

          Bureaucratic: Regular procedures, division of responsibilities, hierarchy, and impersonal relationships

          Democratic: Considering and treating others as equals, more participative in the tasks performed

          Laissez-faire: noninterference, letting people do as they decide

But, being an effective manager does not always mean that makes you an effective leader. The roles are much different. Leadership is the ability to motivate and inspire employees to behave in accordance with the vision of an organization and to accomplish the organization’s goals. Good leaders demonstrate these behaviors:

          Provide direction

o   Leaders communicate clearly and ensure that employees know what is expected of them. One of the ways to accomplish this is to discuss roles and responsibilities with everyone in the operation. This way everyone understands the direction given.

          Lead consistently

o   Using the organization’s mission, vision, and values as checkpoints, leaders maintain standards by holding themselves and other accountable for their actions.

          Influence others

o   Gaining cooperation through caring acts, using persuasion to convince others of appropriate behavior, and offering constructive feedback are ways that leaders influence others. Leaders also examine how to build consensus through a “give” and “take” dialogue as well as encouraging superior performance by relating employees’ actions to the organization’s vision.

          Foster teamwork

o   Leaders create functional work teams that build members’ skills. They also establish cross-functional teams to monitor, standardize, and improve work processes across the company. Assigning problems to temporary groups of selected employees is one way to begin developing these teams.

          Motivate others

o   The importance of communication cannot be overstated. Leaders give pep talks, ask their employees for advice, and vocally praise people’s work. It is also really important to keep employees informed and provide them with a sense of belonging by allowing them to solve problems and contribute ideas.

          Coach and develop employees

o   Leaders instruct employees on better ways to perform a task, offer insights to high-potential workers, and ensure that every employee has a development plan. They also seek out learning opportunities for the staff and encourage them to enroll in these programs.

          Champion change

o   Anticipating the need for change, looking for better ways to do things, understanding the link between change and learning, and communicating the benefits of new processes and procedures are all actions of a leader.

So, overall here are the differences you will want to remember:

          Manager:

o   Plans and budgets

o   Oversees staffing

o   Solves problems

o   Maintains order

o   Write reports and other types of materials

          Leader:

o   Charts a course that provides direction

o   Offers guidance and counsel

o   Motivates and inspires a call to action

o   Creates an environment for change

o   Trains and teaches

mgmt women

mgmt leader

Management1

What Does “Team Growth” Mean to You?

A team, especially one that is in a foodservice operation, has four distinct stages of group development. The four stages of group development were created by Dr. Bruce W. Tuckerman after observation of the different phases in the development and maturity of groups of people.

Forming

The first stage is forming. This is where teams are getting to know each other, as well as learning what will be required of them in order to achieve their assigned goal. This stage is defined by the way the team members approach each other and inspect the limitations of group behavior. The group is also evaluating the manager’s role and leadership. Throughout this stage, the manager takes a larger role in directing the progress of the team. Directing involves telling the group what specifically needs to be accomplished, establishing guidelines, and providing specifics on the five Ws (Who, What, Where, When, Why) and How. At this point, the team members are focusing on being part of a team.

Team Feeling:

          Excitement; Optimism; Pride in being selected; Wondering what role and influence they will have; Anxiety; Questioning why they and other team members were selected

Team Behavior:

          Friendly; Agreeable; Deciding how to accomplish tasks; Determining acceptable team behavior; Information gathering; Handling complaints about the organization; Discussing barriers to the task

Leadership Style:

          Directing

Storming

The second stage is storming. At this point, the reality of the project sets in for the team and various interpersonal struggles begin to surface. Typically, this is the most difficult stage for any team to get through, since power clashes and competition between team members are common and are easily seen here. Besides this realization, team members become impatient with their lack of progress and rely more on individual approaches instead of teamwork. At this time, the manager needs to utilize a coaching style to clarify and explain tasks repeatedly. The manager will need to persuade team members often to work together and refocus their efforts.

            Team Feeling:

          Resistance to approaches different from what the team is comfortable with; Swings in attitudes about the team and project; Questioning many aspects of the task

Team Behavior:

          Arguing; Choosing sides; Perceived “pecking order”; Increased tension; Jealousy; Power struggles; Lack of progress; Loss of interest

Leadership Style:

           Coaching

Norming

The third stage, norming, sees team member settling their differences and developing more cohesive and trusting relationships. The team realizes that they can work together and help each other achieve success. The members understand the team’s needs and accept the team ground rules and the roles that each person plays in achieving the project goals. Conflict decreases as these realizations occur and team members develop more confidence in their ability to work together and accomplish the task. At this time, the manager transitions into a leadership style of supporting the team by providing encouragement, listening more than telling, and promoting team discussions.

            Team Feeling:

          Expressing constructive criticism; Membership acceptance; Relief that things are finally going smoothly; Understanding own contribution; Acceptance of membership

Team Behavior:

          Attempts for harmony; Avoiding conflict; Discussing team dynamics; Sense of common purpose; Establishing and monitoring team rules; Expressing ideas

Leadership Style:

          Supporting

 

Performing

At last but not least, the fourth and final stage is performing. This is where team interdependence is recognized. Team members can analyze and solve problems successfully together. They have accepted each other’s strengths and weaknesses and can adapt to meet the needs of each member. The team becomes very productive and truly adds value to the organizations. At this point, the manager can use a delegating style. The manager no longer needs to provide much direction and can periodically monitor the team’s progress with update meetings.

            Team Feeling:

          Insights into group processes; Understanding of each member’s strengths and weaknesses; Satisfaction with progress; Trusting; Friendly; Having fun

Team Behavior:

          Individual behavior modification; Working through team problems; Close attachment to members; Flexibility; Humor; Ownership of results

Leadership Style:

          Delegating

team growth

team grow

Love Your Heart Fun Lunch

Love Your Heart Fun Lunch- The Main Event

Well, the day finally arrived! Saturday February 2, 2013- The “Love Your Heart Fun Lunch” free heart screening event took place at the WVU Heart Institute in the Suncrest Towne Centre. The ISPP Dietetic Internship was there and we were ready to educate the community all about…. (drum roll please)… PORTION DISTORTION! Since the ISPP Dietetic Internship has an Emphasis Area of “Leadership in Community Wellness”, our table was geared towards addressing what so many Americans find themselves becoming confused about- serving sizes, portion control, and easy ways to remember how to stay healthy.

Our table consisted of the following informational material:

  • Portion distortion flyer
  • Serving sizes- comparing inanimate objects to correct serving sizes
  • Plate proportions
  • Quick, easy recipes for on-the-go people
  • Antioxidants handouts
  • Mindful eating flyer and handouts
  • Incentives- food diary, brochures of the TLC Diet, and Walnuts- relative to heart health

We were asked by the coordinators of the event to wear a red shirt and dress pants. All of the table covers were provided by the staff and they even provided tape for me to use when I was setting up and hanging our “How Well Do You Know Your Portions” poster. The participants received a stamp from the ISPP Dietetic Internship table when they walked through our demonstrations and interacted with our activities. These stamps went on a participant bingo card, which entered them for a chance to win a door prize if they visited each table in the waiting area. Our first activity at our table was Kaylyn’s “Fast Food Quiz”, which was very intriguing to everyone at the event. Our second interactive, hands-on activity was a portion exercise I created. I had two bowls displayed in front of a bowl of rice. The purpose was to have participants portion out how much they thought a normal portion of brown rice was, then portion the appropriate amount into the other bowl to compare the two bowls side-by-side. Only four people tried the activity so, maybe next time I try to implement something like this again, I should include directions displayed for participants to see so there’s no confusion. Overall, the event was a real success for the WVU ISPP. Everyone seemed really open and receptive to the information we were providing to them.

Two-thirds of the ISPP Dietetic Internship ready to promote nutrition literacy!

Two-thirds of the ISPP Dietetic Internship ready to promote nutrition literacy!

 

Portion Distortion!!

Portion Distortion!!

 

Educating a participant on portions and serving sizes. Most people were quite surprised about the size of a "typical" dinner plate and its effects on portion control.

Educating a participant on portions and serving sizes. Most people were quite surprised about the size of a “typical” dinner plate and its effects on portion control.

 

WVU ISPP Dietetic Internship!!

WVU ISPP Dietetic Internship!!

 

An up-close look at our table and handouts!

An up-close look at our table and handouts!