Fathers Hand- Nutrition Education for Male Mentors and Boys

Basil Boys!

A visual for the guys to pass around to touch, feel, and smell fresh basil!

A visual for the guys to pass around to touch, feel, and smell fresh basil!

WVU’s Human Nutrition and Foods department spearheaded a lesson within the existing program, “Fathers Hand” at the Shack Neighborhood House. For those of you that are unfamiliar with the Shack Neighborhood House, commonly known as the Shack, it is a non-profit community center for the surrounding communities of Morgantown, WV. The Shack runs programs for children, adolescents, teens, and families all year long. Throughout the school year, most programming is run after school and in the evening. In the summer time, programs are run throughout the day, as well as in the evening.

Fathers Hand is an evening program that is designed for male adult mentors and male children. Normally, Fathers Hand every 1st, 2nd, and 4th Thursday of the month from 6pm-8pm. Since April is “Child and Family Awareness Month”, the Shack thought it would be nice to have Fathers Hand every Thursday this month, instead. Fathers Hand is an open program to increase male bonding and expose these men and young men, to anything and everything new that they normally wouldn’t have the opportunity to experience without the help from the Shack.

Well, tonight marked our second lesson and had an emphasis on fruits and vegetables, incorporating the use of container gardens. I developed the lesson plans for the 3 weeks of content for the program, as well as creating handouts, recipes, instructions for activities, and purchased the groceries. Within the lesson, a dinner/meal is included so, we try to always make something for the participants that’s easy to make AND healthy as well. WVU Student Dietetic Association (SDA) volunteers to help cook the meals each lesson. This way, participants are encouraged to try to make these meals outside of the Shack, within their home environment.

Tonight, the lesson consisted of information about how many servings of fruits and vegetables that everyone should be eating. The participants learned the concept of “5-A-Day”, which refers to eating 5 servings of fruits and vegetables each day. The theme of tonight’s lesson was BASIL! The activity was making container basil gardens out of plastic cups. This will serve as a “starter” garden for all the guys, adults included. Both recipes that the participants were served, contained basil and were made with healthy ingredients, which the participants received recipe handouts on as well.

The participants were educated on the MyPlate, using a poster, and focusing on fruits and vegetables. The lesson focused on fruit and vegetable identification, so fresh basil was passed around as a visual for everyone to touch, feel, and smell. The incorporation of fruits and vegetables that were unfamiliar like heirloom tomatoes, fresh basil, avocados, and mangoes was another visual for the participants. The lesson was geared towards green leafy vegetables but, also incorporated “new” and unfamiliar produce which we aim to accomplish overall to teach everyone food identification skills that they could use all year long! 

Shack Neighborhood House

The beginning of the basil, tomato, and zucchini casserole!

The beginning of the basil, tomato, and zucchini casserole!

basil garden1

basil garden

A variety of heirloom tomatoes to show the participants that veggies come in different colors, you wouldn't think of!

A variety of heirloom tomatoes to show the participants that veggies come in different colors, you wouldn’t think of!

heirloom2

heirloom_red

heirloom_lgreenheirloom_yellow

heirloom_green

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Our Healthy Roadtrip Has Begun!

Roadtrippin’ With My Favorite Friends

Yesterday, Monday March 4th, was the launch of this semester’s Shack Neighborhood House nutrition education programming. Every semester and summer, the WVU Didactic Program in Dietetics implements a nutrition education program at the Shack Neighborhood House. The Shack is no stranger to this group of future Dietitians. The two organizations have been collaborating for years now. Over the summer we ran “Carrot Sticks”- a nutrition education program focusing on food culture, smoothies, and fruits/vegetables. In the fall, we ran a program called “Racing the Rainbow”- a nutrition education program that focused on different colors of the rainbow correlating to the different food groups.

All of our programs have a target population of youth, usually between the ages of K-5, or more specifically K-2. I’ve somewhat mastered a system as to how we organize each lesson plan within the programs.

Part 1- Nutrition education

–        MyPlate

–        Focus on a specific type of food (Example- berries, potatoes, avocados, etc.)

–        Focus on the specific benefits of our targeted food of discussion

Part 2- Snack incorporating the food(s) we’ve discussed

–        We make sure that the snack is interactive and they are required to make/build/construct it in an artistic nature

Part 3- Activity

–        We usually find crafts related to our lesson topic

–        I try to make sure that we find activities that the students can cognitively grasp, but also enjoy and learn from as well.

This week, we focused on the region of Oregon. And we discussed the benefits of potatoes but, focused more on the health benefits of berries. The undergraduates used a MyPlate visual as an aid to guide the students in questions, regarding different food groups.

Each week, I will put stickers on the region that we “drove” to on our healthy roadtrip across America.

“Our Healthy Roadtrip” will continue for 5 additional lessons (excluding March 25th because of WVU’s Spring Recess).  I took the liberty at creating a poster of the map of the U.S. to document all the different regions of the country, which the program will touch base on.

Only time will tell, if the Shack’s students start to really get into “Our Healthy Roadtrip” theme this Spring!

Shack Neighborhood House

RT

The location of our new nutrition education curriculum!

The location of “Our Healthy Roadtrip” program!

RTT

A Guatemalan Getaway

A Taste Around the World: A Guatemalan Getaway

So, for the ISPP Dietetic Interns final food culture lesson plan on the semester, we decided to go along with our Guatemalan theme and name our final Taste Around the World: A Guatemalan Getaway. This week, instead of focusing our nutrition education and food culture towards Mexican flavors, we decided to head a little more South.

Our nutrition education component of the program focused on the significance that fiber plays in the role of Guatemalan native’s diets and how it affects their health. We had on display a poster of the Guatemalan food guide compared to the US’s MyPlate. And boy, was there a difference! It was really interesting to see how many participants actually noticed the difference between each country’s food guide and how it impacted our healthy as well.

As the ISPP Dietetic Interns did last time, we developed and hosted this food culture nutrition education program. Not only did we develop and run the entire program, we came prepared this time. With funds from the Student Dietetic Association, we invested in culinary equipment like knives and cutting boards. Me, being the thrifty gal that I am, found a place that sold large amounts of 7 inch Santoku knives and small cutting boards…. The Dollar Tree. Who would’ve thought? After weeks of calling bulk culinary companies, I finally found what we were looking for. This way, participants could have their own “Taste Around the World” kitchen set. And we could add some consistency to the development phases of the program. Overall, I would say the program was another success and I will never forget that good deals can be in the last place you would expect.

Giving everyone a slice at knife skills

Giving everyone a slice at knife skills

Fiber-tastic!

Fiber-tastic!

Guatemalan Hot Chocolate!

Guatemalan Hot Chocolate!

ISPP Dietetic Interns always say "Safety First!"

ISPP Dietetic Interns always say “Safety First!”

Everyone loves vegetables!

Everyone loves vegetables!

So everyone can read our motto in the demo mirror!

So everyone can read our motto in the demo mirror!

Always brushing up on our culinary knife skills!

Always brushing up on our culinary knife skills!

Our salsa station!

Our salsa station!

Our festive table cloth to go with our theme!

Our festive table cloth to go with our theme!

The Baked Tamale Station! Yumm-O

The Baked Tamale Station! Yumm-O

The end product of our tamale adventure!

The end product of our tamale adventure!

The calm before the storm!

The calm before the storm!

ISPP Dietetic Internship

 

Community Wellness Action Team Meeting

Undergraduate Action Team Meeting

Well, let’s see… As the Community Wellness ISPP (Individualized Supervised Practice Pathway) Dietetic Intern, it’s my responsibility to get my Action Team in the community and promoting nutrition education and overall healthy thinking and decision-making by Morgantown’s population. So, for this meeting that took place on Monday February 11th at 5:30pm on WVU’s Evansdale campus, we had a mapped out plan of what we needed to address and where we need to go, in terms of community wellness.

WV Action For Healthy Kids (AFHK) Undergraduate intern:

The Shack Neighborhood House Undergraduate Intern:

  • We’ve decided that most of our projects/presentations that we work on in our group, we will work as a team. I made this very clear at the very first meeting. I want to make sure everyone is involved with everything. That being said, an after-school nutrition education program was assigned to this Undergrad intern. Thankfully, the intern has help from our Community Wellness Action Team. So, I already had the thought in my mind that I wanted an after-school program based on something similar to a Rachel Ray show where she travels around the country. I wanted to implement a program where children at the Shack Neighborhood House can get the opportunity at becoming exposed to different regions of the country and still have that nutrition component as well. So, we created a program called “Our Healthy Roadtrip”. This program will last 6 weeks long and be held every Monday from 4:15pm-5:15pm. Our start date is March 4th and we’ll need a minimum of 2 volunteers for every lesson. Each lesson will consist of a nutrition education component, a section on exposure to that specific region’s food habits, and then a snack and interactive activity for the students.
  • Another project is organizing the Oxfam Hunger Banquet, that the Undergrad intern has named Mountaineering Against Hunger. Right now the beginning process is in effect where committees are filling up. Then, once these 3 committees are fulfilled, then further actions like venue planning and food donations can take place.
  • Other projects and events that our Action Team is in the process of organizing is Father’s HAND, Cross-Country Casserole Club, and Family Fun Night.

The Children’s Discovery Museum of West Virginia Undergraduate Intern

  • All of the events for the CDMWV for the semester are, for the most part, set in stone and already organized. It is this intern’s responsibility to complete these tasks and delegate any other duties needed. This Undergrad intern is working with another Graduate student on developing a program called “Healthy Passport”.
  • I also assigned this intern to develop a timeline of all events that take place at the CDMWV throughout the entire semester. This way, we can organize, and possibly even collaborate with another organization, other events and programming within the Morgantown, WV area.

As a Community Wellness Action Team I have decided that we will have our own National Nutrition Month campaign. National Nutrition Month is celebrated throughout the entire month of March and this year’s theme is “Eat Right, Your Way, Every Day”. Specifically, March 13th is National Registered Dietitian (RD) Day.

Sooo…… I think I somewhat caught my team off guard by telling them my idea. I want us to use guerrilla marketing with National Nutrition Month and utilize the Student Dietetic Association to do so. My plan is to recruit HN&F students to draw USDA’s MyPlates ALL over the Morgantown area, specifically on all 3 campuses, in different colored sidewalk chalk. And I plan on having people doing so on a daily basis, in case weather prevents us from our guerrilla nutrition parade. Then, on March 19th, the Student Dietetic Association will have a table outside of the Mountainlair on the downtown campus and have a GIANT MyPlate drawing in front of our table on the ground. At our table we’ll have lot of fun interactive nutrition activities, handouts, healthy recipes, healthy snacks, and food guide pyramids from all over the world, including USDA’s MyPlate- of course. I think this will be a really innovative and unique approach at National Nutrition Month (NNM)  and promoting health awareness on a large scale.

USDA MyPlate Food Guide

USDA MyPlate Food Guide

One of the intern's assigned projects

One of the intern’s assigned projects

The Shack Neighborhood House. A primary stakeholder within our program!

The Shack Neighborhood House. A primary stakeholder within our program!

WV AFHK is a stakeholder within our ISPP Dietetic Internship

WV AFHK is a stakeholder within our ISPP Dietetic Internship

The Children's Discovery Museum of WV collaborates with our program for special eventing and nutrition programming on several different levels.

The Children’s Discovery Museum of WV collaborates with our program for special eventing and nutrition programming on several different levels.

This year's NNM theme for 2013

This year’s NNM theme for 2013

 

 

 

 

Love Your Heart Fun Lunch Set-Up

Love Your Heart (The Before)

I got to sneak a picture of the sign when you enter the 2nd floor of the WVU Heart Institute

I got to sneak a picture of the sign when you enter the 2nd floor of the WVU Heart Institute

On Friday February 1st, the ISPP and GDI Interns were asked to come to the WVU Heart Institute to set up for the upcoming event that was taking place the next day. Elaine Bowen, a WVU Extension Specialist, asked us to attend the “Love Your Heart Fun Lunch” event. This event is a free health screening fair that participants attend, on a first come, first serve basis. The day before the event, volunteers and coordinators took time out of their day to prepare for the health screening extravaganza. Volunteers from the School of Nursing and the School of Pharmacy, from WVU’s Health Sciences campus (HSC), were in attendance at the set up event. It was communicated that we, “nutrition people”, arrive to start help setting up at 5pm on that Friday. Well, since there was only two ISPP Dietetic Interns (including myself) that were going to be responsible for our “Community Nutrition” table, I told Kaylyn (the other ISPP Dietetic Intern) that I would go to the set up event. I did this because there really was no reason to have two people setting up our table. I arrived with my materials, posters, handouts, and other nutrition equipment and waited for instructions, with other students from HSC. To my surprise, when introductions from coordinators started to begin, I was introduced to the whole group of students because I was the only nutrition person who arrived to set up prior to the event. The GDI Interns were administering the screening process (meal planning) of the health fair and the ISPP Interns were responsible for a “Community Nutrition” table in the waiting area for participants to interact with and gain a little more health-related information. Since I was the only nutrition person to attend the event set-up, this gave me a few opportunities to take time to meet everyone that was involved in the planning and organizing of the event. The coordinators provided everyone with an itinerary and a map of the heart screening. The coordinators also shared with the group a Proclamation signed by the Governor of West Virginia, which was my first time seeing anything like that before. Then, the other volunteers were given a tour of each station of the heart screening maze for the next day. Since the ISPP Dietetic Internship table was in the waiting area with other community partners, like the School of Dentistry and EMS, I opted to help others move furniture and carry items inside from coordinator’s cars. I actually ended up getting the ISPP table set up fairly quick so, I helped with anything that anyone needed help with. Overall, I’m glad I came to set up because it made the next morning less stressful for Kaylyn and I. I also had the opportunity to network with other students and faculty in WVU health-related fields.

heart setup_itin

heart setup_itinn

heart setup_itinnn

Starting from the left side of our "community Nutrition" table

Starting from the left side of our “Community Nutrition” table

The middle section of our table- pre-event status

The middle section of our table- pre-event status

And the right side of our table. The only piece to this puzzle that was missing was Kaylyn's "Fast Food Quiz", which she brought the next mooring.

And the right side of our table. The only piece to this puzzle that was missing was Kaylyn’s “Fast Food Quiz”, which she brought the next morning.

A visual I created for participants to realize what the MyPlate actually looks like, compared to an actual oversized plate that most Americans use in their home on a daily rate.

A visual I created for participants to realize what the MyPlate actually looks like, compared to an actual oversized plate that most Americans use in their home on a daily basis.

The volunteer's map of the heart screen- to look over in case participants need help finding stations the next day.

The volunteer’s map of the heart screen- to look over in case participants need help finding stations the next day.

Overall- what the ISPP Dietetic Internship Community Nutrition table looked like the night before the event took place!

Overall- what the ISPP Dietetic Internship Community Nutrition table looked like the night before the event took place!

Nutrition Myth Busters

Nutrition Myth Busters

I stumbled across a clip from Fox News on nutrition myths. The news station put into perspective how consumers seem to be confused about what’s really healthy versus unhealthy.

For a professional opinion, the show brought on Elizabeth Ward, RD to play their version of Myth Busters for all those consumers who thought they were grocery shopping the “right” way. Elizabeth Ward is not only a RD, but also the author of “MyPlate for Moms: How to Feed Yourself and Your Family Better”. So, the host and guest host addressed 4 commonly thought myths from consumers across the country.

Myth 1: All white foods are bad.

  • A common misconception is that consumers should avoid all white and tan colored foods.
  • Consumers focus so much on bright colored fruits and vegetables, and apprehensively shy away from white colored foods.
  • Consumers assume that they should avoid all white carbs because of their bad reputation.
  • The standard is 3 servings/day of whole grains
  • People need to understand that the key to a healthy diet is a balanced diet.
  • There are white foods that consumers do not need to be afraid of! If they’re looking for those phytochemicals that are in all those bright, colorful veggies- there’s no need to stray away.
  • Here are some white colored fruits and veggies to think about: cauliflower, mushrooms, bananas, dates, garlic, ginger, jicama, kohlrabi, onions, parsnips, shallots, turnips, and white corn. These foods also include those important phytochemicals that are in brighter colored produce.

Myth 2: All canned fruits and vegetables are bad.

  • Most consumers assume that canned fruits and vegetables are unhealthy. This is not true.
  • Elizabeth reminds viewers that not all canned fruits and vegetables are created equally.
  • Consumers need to look for labels that read:
  1. No added salt
  2. No added sugar, or
  3. Low sodium
  • Canned fruits and vegetables are picked at ripeness. The canning process actually preserves the nutritional value in these foods. And this is especially important in those cold winter months when your favorite produce isn’t in season.
  • The important issue here is READING the LABELS on your canned foods (as mentioned above)
  • Elizabeth Ward also reminds viewers that fruit cups in water or 100% juice is another form of a healthier canned food item.

Myth 3: Eggs are as healthy as cigarettes.

  • This statement was based on an observational study done by scientists. It wasn’t based on a cause and effect study. So, that alone implies biased reasoning.
  • According to Harvard’s School of Public Health, a healthy person can eat 1 egg per day.
  • I think that the uproar about this is the fact that yolk has a bad reputation, concerning cholesterol levels.
  • But, our RD on-hand explains that yolks consist of 90% of an egg’s nutritional value.

Myth 4: You lose weight by only exercising.  

  • A lot of consumers believe that they can eat whatever they want and just workout a little bit longer, and the weight will just shed off of them. This isn’t true either!
  • Studies have shown that shorter exercises and cutting back on calories will result in more weight loss and for the long-run.
  • Harder workouts aren’t acknowledged as longitudinal, compared to shorter, more frequent workouts
  • And of course, cutting back on calories is definitely a major component in weight loss. Ridding unnecessary calories from your typical diet is the key to success.
  • Again, the concept of moderation is stressed here again. Everything that a healthy person does to their body or consumes in their body should be in moderation. Physical exertion and calories included.

http://www.myfoxboston.com/category/233810/fox-25-morning-news

Introducing the MyBowl

What is MyBowl?

The image for the new MyBowl campaign that Kelloggs has launched

MyBowl is an education tool that is an extension of the MyPlate food guide, used across the United States. MyBowl is designed to show how easy it is to meet dietary recommendations with meals served in bowls, like breakfast cereals.

MyPlate is a recognized education instrument developed by the USDA that brings to life the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, to help people get the most nutrition from their meals. A recent survey shows that 100% of RDs are aware of MyPlate and 99% of them agreed that it is a helpful tool. There’s an opportunity to help consumers further understand and apply MyPlate recommendations to meals people eat in bowls, too. Using specific visual cues, images, and icons are effective ways to educate the public. MyBowl helps illustrate and extend the message that all food groups can fit into all meals, even those traditionally served in bowls like cereal breakfast, soup, and salads. 95% of RDs expect the MyBowl graphic to be used in addition to MyPlate.

Like MyPlate, MyBowl is a simple visual cue to help people get the most nutrition from meals served in bowls. MyBowl is a simple tool that helps people understand how specific foods fit into “food groups”, like how a cereal breakfast with fruit delivers servings from “grains, dairy and fruit food groups”. MyBowl was purposefully created to match the features of MyPlate. The MyBowl colors are identical to those used in MyPlate. The positioning and size of the colored bands around MyBowl reflects different types and amounts of foods and food group combinations that could be enjoyed in a bowl. When used as an online interactive tool, the size and color of the bands around MyBowl will change to reflect the amount and type of foods actually in the bowl. ChooseMyBowl.com is an interactive site that features tips, tools and meal plans to show people how to make smart choices and enjoy a variety of food groups and nutrients in delicious bowl meals.

People need help starting the day with a balanced breakfast; research shows:

  • While more than half of all adults would like to eat breakfast every day, only one-third actually do.
  • Nearly all moms want their kids to eat breakfast every day; however, 40% of moms report their child doesn’t eat breakfast daily.
  • While nearly all toddlers and preschool-age children are eating breakfast, consumption of breakfast decreases as American children grow older. 77% of young children eat breakfast every day, but the number falls to 50% in the middle-school years and 36% among high school students.
  • The latest research from the International Food Information Council (IFIC) shows people who eat breakfast regularly have higher intakes of several vitamin and minerals.
  • The same research noted that breakfast skippers may not make up for missed nutrients at other meals during the day.

MyBowl helps people realize that eating breakfast can be a fast and easy solution to achieving a varied diet and meeting nutrient needs.

When it comes to breakfast, cereal with non-fat milk is a nutrient-dense choice eaten in a bowl, delivering several essential nutrients in less than 150 kcal per serving, on average. Cereal with milk is the leading source of 10 nutrients in children’s diets and provides four nutrients, including fiber, most likely to be lacking in kids’ diets. Cereal with milk may deliver good or excellent sources of the 4 nutrients of concern- calcium, potassium, vitamin D, and fiber. Studies show that cereal eaters have higher intakes of many essential nutrients including B vitamins, calcium, vitamin A, and vitamin D. Numerous studies show that a cereal breakfast is associated with a lower BMI in both children and adults. Cereal with milk is an affordable breakfast option- costing just 50 cents per serving, on average.

A cereal breakfast can help Americans get more fiber, which was noted in the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans as a “nutrient of concern”. Nine out of ten Americans don’t meet daily recommendations for fiber. On average, Americans consume just about half of the required fiber that they need each day. Many experts think Americans poor fiber intake is a public health concern for both adults and children, with potential consequences that may increase the risk for several chronic diseases and obesity. In a recent survey, 90% of RDs agreed that a cereal breakfast is one of the best ways to easily increase fiber intake. On average, Americans only get 18% of their daily fiber at breakfast.

The MyPlate design published by the USDA. This replaced the MyPyramid in June 2011, ending 19 years of USDA food guide diagrams.