Qatar Outdoes America in Obesity Rates?

Well, America isn’t the Only Heavy Hitter Anymore…

The obesity epidemic in America has obviously generated a lot of publicity, in recent years. And more specifically, West Virginia has been in that spotlight with its towering obesity rates, let alone its childhood obesity rates.

But, now Qatar has been given that title of being the most obese country in the world.  According to new data release by the Supreme Council of Health, about 70% of people in Qatar are overweight and some 41% are obese.

If you’ve read my blogs before, I have posted about the Middle East and its urbanization, associated with fast food chains and obesity rates. The rapid urbanization in Qatar, and many other states in the Arab Peninsula, following the discovery of oil has contributed to a sedentary lifestyle. Coupled with a lack of exercise culture and diets high in fats, salts and sugar, obesity has rapidly increased in the Middle East.

The rapid increase in obesity has led to an increase in several non-communicable diseases in the small Gulf country, such as diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and some cancers. According to the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), the rate of diabetes in Qatar has climbed to 20.2% of the population.

Often people think that they need to do a lot to prevent illnesses. That is not the case. Often simply making minimal changes will help. The incidence of these diseases can be significantly reduced by simple lifestyle changes, such as increased regular exercise and integrating healthier foods into your diet.

Just alone is 2012, studies showed that 45% of adult Qataris were obese and up to 40% of school children were obese as well. Many Qataris, especially dietitians, are worried that in the next 5 years that 73% of Qatari women and 69% of Qatari men will be obese. Combined with high rates of diabetes, often triggered by excess weight, this has become a national… Wait, now a global concern for the country. In 2012, 15.4% of adult had diabetes, with rates in children below the age of 5 ay 28.8%.

Qatar surpasses US in obesity

Qatar is World’s Wealthiest and Obese

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C-section Babies and Obesity

C-section Babies and Obesity

Children born via cesarean section are slightly more likely than babies delivered vaginally to become heavy or obese, according to a new review of studies.

The results don’t prove that C-sections cause children to put on weight, but Dr. Jianmeng Liu, one of the authors of the study and a professor at Peking University Health Science Center, said the link between the delivery and obesity is important to keep in mind.

“The potential health burden of obesity and other diseases associated with C-section births should not be neglected, even if its impact is modest, particularly given” how often births happen that way, Liu told Reuters Health in an email.

Liu said that the relationship between the type of delivery and obesity among kids hasn’t been as clear.

The research team collected the results from nine studies that included more than 200,000 people.

People were 33% more likely to be overweight or obese if they were born by C-section, researchers report in the International Journal of Obesity.

Nearly 70 percent of adults in the U.S. are overweight or obese. A 33 percent increase from that number would mean that 93 percent would be heavy.

The risk for childhood obesity in particular was somewhat higher – about a 40% rise over kids born vaginally.

Nearly one in five kids aged six to 11 is obese in the U.S., according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Liu said the increase in risk was modest, but that it persists into adulthood. When the researchers looked just at the studies on adults, they found that those who were born surgically were 50 percent more likely to be obese than those who were born vaginally.

But, why the link??

It’s not clear why C-section births are tied to a better chance of being overweight.

One possibility relates to the bacteria babies are exposed to when they are delivered vaginally, which might affect the way they process and store food, said Liu.

Additionally, Liu added, researchers have suggested that C-sections are linked with a lower concentration in the umbilical cord of a hormone important in regulating weight and with a reduced rate of breastfeeding, “both of which are reported to be associated with an increased risk of later obesity.”

Babies who are larger than normal are also more likely to be born via cesarean, but most of the studies Liu’s team analyzed took into account birth weight.

Cesareans have become increasingly common, and in the U.S. now 1 in 4 babies are born through a C-section.

Liu said there’s been concern that some of these are unnecessary, and given the potential negative impacts on children the unneeded ones should be restrained.

“In clinical practice, (the) potential adverse impact of C-section should be considered by medical staff, and non-medically indicated elective C-section should be somewhat avoided, where possible,” Liu said.

http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/12/12/us-csection-babies-overweight-idUSBRE8BB1JY20121212

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