Purple Corn is the New Rage?

Purple Corn is the New Rage?

Recently Dr. Oz, yes THE Dr. Oz, has stated that the color purple is currently “hot”.  And from my experience with anything that Dr. Oz says, nutritionally, everyone listens.

Purple corn has recently been crowned the king of the crop, according to Minnesota-based Suntava. From purple carrots, potatoes, tomatoes, cauliflower to blackberries, grapes, blueberries, and cabbage, a deep purple shade is usually a good sign that fruits or vegetables contain a healthy dose of valuable phytonutrients.

Suntava purple corn has an ORAC value (per 100 grams) of 10,800, where blueberries have 4,669. ORAC scores should not be viewed in seclusion because they are a good indicator of the free-radical busting potential of foods.

The average consumer probably has never heard of purple corn before, like myself. But, shoppers are increasingly becoming more aware of the powerhouse grain source.

Suntava, which initially focused on bringing natural colors from purple corn to market as a replacement for synthetic dye Red 40, has since expanded into purple corn meal, which is used in everything from tortilla chips to snack bars, sourdough, cereals, and cakes.

The important fact that really jumped out to me when I first read about the purple-colored food source, is that its non-GMO. While certain food companies are more interested in the novelty factor of purple snacks, others have really zoned in on the antioxidant message that this food brings to the table.

Suntava Launches Purple Corn to Super Foods Status

USDA ORAC

purple corn suntava

purple corn chips

purple corn

A Very Merry Holiday

A Very Merry Holiday

There are several times throughout the year when people focus on losing weight — just before their birthday, leading up to a wedding or important event, and a few months prior to bathing suit season.

But there’s usually only one occasion when people forget about losing weight and simply concentrate on not gaining any. And that’s the holidays.

Thanksgiving is long gone, so if you had a few too many slices of Grandma’s pumpkin pie, relax and let it go. There’s no reason to feel guilty!

Instead, look ahead to Christmas. It’s the second time in the span of about 1 month that people will gather for absurd amounts of food, and, most importantly, quality family time.

By Dec. 26, everyone regrets that fourth helping of stuffing, fifth buttered roll and sixth biscotti, no matter how enjoyable they were the day before. To avoid feeling overstuffed prepare a plan beforehand. This will also help shed worries of weight gain and hopefully keep you from closing out 2012 with an extra 10 pounds on your hips.

Just say no….

A lot of holiday foods can be tempting, which is why it’s important to remember the phrase “mind over matter.”

Aunt Ginger may make the most delicious mashed potatoes you’ve ever tasted, so you tend not to realize that they’re loaded with fat and dripping with butter. You think you need to scoop up as many as you can before your rambunctious cousins get to them, but the fact is, the dish will be there next year and for many years to come.

This isn’t the last pan of mashed potatoes on the planet. Think of it that way and it’ll be easier to turn them down.

Also keep in mind that just because everyone around you is stuffing themselves doesn’t mean you need to follow suit.

The key is to eat until you’re satisfied, and not full. Pace yourself because you may tend to eat less! The slower you eat sometimes, the more full your stomach gets quicker. And make sure you listen to your stomach when it feels full…

Learn what’s what…

Something may seem healthful on the surface, but that doesn’t mean that’s truly the case. Sure, that green bean casserole has vegetables, but it also has creamy soup with all-too-high fat and sodium levels.

Try to learn exactly what’s in the food you’re eating so you know whether it’s OK to dive in for seconds.

“Ultimately, just a general education of wellness is always very important for everyone”

Pay attention to things like antioxidants and good fats vs. bad fats. A bowl of almonds, pecans and peanuts will make an excellent pre-meal snack and offers healthful fats at the same time.

A tray of sliced fruits and vegetables provides another convenient appetizer with plenty of health benefits.

“Things with lots of colors — they all have tons of antioxidants in them”

Consider volunteering to do the cooking for your family so you’ll have ultimate control over the nutrition on the table come Christmas Day. Plus this gives Nanny a break from all that cooking too!

Tweak tradition…

Holiday classics don’t have to be eliminated. Just look for ways to make them as nutritious as possible. For example, you can continue your family’s tradition of having a 20-pound turkey as the main dish, but don’t get any fancy ideas about deep frying the bird.

“Baking, broiling and grilling are really the best cooking methods”. Take the skin off the turkey before you eat it to make it even better for you.

Stuffing is also found in many holiday feasts, and it’s another dish that can be altered with ease. Making it from scratch and tossing in some dried cranberries will add fiber. Also, using whole wheat bread is also a healthy tweak to an old family tradition.

“When you’re choosing your foods during the holiday season or making recipes, try to continue to add whole grains to your diet”

Think ahead…

In the future, try to keep up with healthy habits before and after the holiday season. If you stick to normal portions and maintain a nutritious diet on a regular basis, it won’t be hard to stay in control on Christmas.

“Truly, it’s what you do all year round so that one day isn’t going to make a huge difference”

http://www.piercecountyherald.com/event/article/id/49987/group/News/

xmas_dinner

Shingles and Nutrition

shinglesShingles and Your Diet

Shingles, also known as herpes zoster, is a viral infection that causes a rash that can be painful. According to MayoClinic.com, shingles typically resolves on its own, but medications can help hustle up the healing process and relieve pain. Certain nutrients have displayed pain-relieving assets, and incorporating these into your diet can help with shingles or painful difficulties.

First

Add foods to your diet that are rich in lysine. Or you can take a lysine supplement. Lysine is an amino acid that may prevent herpes virus outbreaks, says the University of Maryland Medical Center. Dietary sources of this amino acid include meat, cheese, sardines, eggs, soybeans, beans and legumes. Fenugreek seed is also a good source of lysine.

Second

Eat shellfish, eggs, beef and dairy products, all of which contain vitamin B-12.

Third

Take a vitamin E supplement. Mount Auburn Hospital recommends taking 1,200 to 1,600 international units per day of vitamin E for postherpetic neuralgia. Dietary sources of vitamin E include almonds, spinach, broccoli, mangoes, tomatoes, peanuts and peanut butter.

Fourth

Stock up on foods high in vitamin C and zinc. MayoClinic.com states that shingles outbreaks can occur due to an impaired immune system, and vitamin C and zinc are essential in promoting a healthy immune system. Good sources of vitamin C include oranges, strawberries, broccoli, leafy greens, peppers and potatoes. Oysters, red meats, chicken, legumes and whole grains are also good sources of zinc.

What to Avoid when you have Shingles

Shingles

According to the Mayo Clinic, shingles are red, raw and very painful blisters that can appear anywhere on your body but typically appear as blisters that wrap around your torso. If you have previously had chicken pox, are over 50 and have a weakened immune system, you are most at risk for contracting shingles. The CDC advises you to stay away from infants, pregnant women and others who have compromised immune systems until your shingles outbreak has passed.

Foods to Avoid

Avoiding certain foods can help alleviate symptoms of shingles. Arginine is an amino acid that your body produces naturally, but you should avoid foods that contain it. Arginine helps the herpes zoster virus to replicate. Chocolate, nuts and gelatin contain high levels of arginine. Also, don’t consume foods such as saturated fats or refined carbohydrates, because those might cause further inflammation. In addition, avoid alcohol and caffeine because these can weaken the immune system.