Major Match Day

Major Match Day at WVU

Major Match Day at WVU was held last Wednesday in the Mountainlair Ballrooms. What this special day is, a collaborative effort from all participating WVU departments to provide information about the different programs and majors that WVU has to offer. So, freshman who are undecided about their major, people looking to pick up a minor, and even local high school students came to the event to search their options. Over 100 majors were represented and over 900 students were in attendance. The event was held by WVU’s Undergraduate Advising Services Center (UASC) and they provided everyone with a table and chairs.

It was really interesting to not only see how many different majors and minors were available at WVU but, also to see how the different departments represented themselves. I have never attended anything like this before, let alone spearhead it. But, I had fun. I had the chance to explain our program, our course list, and specifically what you can do with a degree in Human Nutrition and Foods. I brought my laptop with me to show students different pathways that this major can lead you in and explained to them the thousands of ways they can utilize it.

The event was 10am-4pm so, I arrived approximately at 9:00am to make sure I was set up properly and felt comfortable with my table’s arrangement. I recruited 3 other undergraduate students from the WVU Student Dietetic Association to also give students advice about the program since they were prime examples of HNF, currently. And honestly, it felt rewarding to explain Human Nutrition and Foods to students because, I think the program was never properly explained to me when I first entered the program as an undergraduate student. Overall, it was a really good experience and the coordinator said they will hopefully have another Major Match Day for the Fall semester.

From left to right: Brooke Irwin, Brooke Cenkus, and Mary Salvatore (All undergraduate students in HNF). And then me all the way on the right :)

From left to right: Brooke Irwin, Brooke Cenkus, and Mary Salvatore (All undergraduate students in HNF). And then me all the way on the right 🙂

A social media card I made for students to take from our table.

A social media card I made for students to take from our table.

The UASC gave us templates to keep track of students who inquired information about our program

The UASC gave us templates to keep track of students who inquired information about our program

An afternoon snack provided to all the departments for attending the event! Yumm!

An afternoon snack provided to all the departments for attending the event! Yumm!

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A Guatemalan Getaway

A Taste Around the World: A Guatemalan Getaway

So, for the ISPP Dietetic Interns final food culture lesson plan on the semester, we decided to go along with our Guatemalan theme and name our final Taste Around the World: A Guatemalan Getaway. This week, instead of focusing our nutrition education and food culture towards Mexican flavors, we decided to head a little more South.

Our nutrition education component of the program focused on the significance that fiber plays in the role of Guatemalan native’s diets and how it affects their health. We had on display a poster of the Guatemalan food guide compared to the US’s MyPlate. And boy, was there a difference! It was really interesting to see how many participants actually noticed the difference between each country’s food guide and how it impacted our healthy as well.

As the ISPP Dietetic Interns did last time, we developed and hosted this food culture nutrition education program. Not only did we develop and run the entire program, we came prepared this time. With funds from the Student Dietetic Association, we invested in culinary equipment like knives and cutting boards. Me, being the thrifty gal that I am, found a place that sold large amounts of 7 inch Santoku knives and small cutting boards…. The Dollar Tree. Who would’ve thought? After weeks of calling bulk culinary companies, I finally found what we were looking for. This way, participants could have their own “Taste Around the World” kitchen set. And we could add some consistency to the development phases of the program. Overall, I would say the program was another success and I will never forget that good deals can be in the last place you would expect.

Giving everyone a slice at knife skills

Giving everyone a slice at knife skills

Fiber-tastic!

Fiber-tastic!

Guatemalan Hot Chocolate!

Guatemalan Hot Chocolate!

ISPP Dietetic Interns always say "Safety First!"

ISPP Dietetic Interns always say “Safety First!”

Everyone loves vegetables!

Everyone loves vegetables!

So everyone can read our motto in the demo mirror!

So everyone can read our motto in the demo mirror!

Always brushing up on our culinary knife skills!

Always brushing up on our culinary knife skills!

Our salsa station!

Our salsa station!

Our festive table cloth to go with our theme!

Our festive table cloth to go with our theme!

The Baked Tamale Station! Yumm-O

The Baked Tamale Station! Yumm-O

The end product of our tamale adventure!

The end product of our tamale adventure!

The calm before the storm!

The calm before the storm!

ISPP Dietetic Internship

 

Connecting Undergrads with Grad Students

Undergraduates are Important too

Last Monday, midway through my mini kitchen audit, I attended the WVU Student Dietetic Association meeting.  This on-campus organization consists mainly of WVU undergraduate students in the “Human Nutrition & Foods” or “Bachelor’s in Agriculture with an Emphasis in Nutrition” degrees. I attend these meetings to offer service learning opportunities to the undergraduate students and to keep a “connection” between undergraduates and graduate students. The SDA members usually ask me questions and advice on events, policies, and projects that they are currently working on.

Last week’s meeting entailed:

  • National Nutrition Month ideas and projects
  • Relay For Life
  • Snack boxes to be made by SDA for troops in Afghanistan
  • Valentine’s Day gift bags for the Rosenbaum House
  • School of Pharmacy Dinner at the WV Family Grief Center
  • Happy School programming at the Shack Neighborhood House

 

The Never-Ending Week of Nutrition

What a week I have had! Let’s map this week out thus far…

Monday

  • WVU Agricultural Sciences Annex Test Kitchen audit 4pm-6:30pm; 7:30pm-9pm
  • Student Dietetic Association meeting 6:30pm

Tuesday

  • ISPP Action Team Undergraduate Intern meeting 6:30pm
  • Action For Healthy Kids
  • Shack Neighborhood House
  • Children’s Discovery Museum of WV
  • Davis College of Agriculture, Natural Resources, and Design

Wednesday

  • A Taste Around the World: “A Mountaineer Mexican Fiesta”
  • A program educating students on campus (undergraduates/graduates) about food culture awareness, nutrition education, and culinary skill-building.
  • Located at the Ag Sciences Annex Test Kitchen 6pm-8pm

Thursday

  • Organized information and recruitment for an event that the WVU School of Pharmacy invited us to.
  • The information was presented to the West Virginia Grief Center.
  • Thursday Jan 31st 5:45pm; Present information at approximately 6:15pm

Friday

  • Women Love Your Heart Health Screening set-up
  • Friday Feb. 1st 5pm

Saturday

  • Women Love Your Heart Health Screening main event
  • Saturday Feb. 2nd 7:30am-2pm

 

So, stay tuned ladies and gentleman… You’ll be reading some very interesting community nutrition blogs within the next few days!

Introducing the MyBowl

What is MyBowl?

The image for the new MyBowl campaign that Kelloggs has launched

MyBowl is an education tool that is an extension of the MyPlate food guide, used across the United States. MyBowl is designed to show how easy it is to meet dietary recommendations with meals served in bowls, like breakfast cereals.

MyPlate is a recognized education instrument developed by the USDA that brings to life the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, to help people get the most nutrition from their meals. A recent survey shows that 100% of RDs are aware of MyPlate and 99% of them agreed that it is a helpful tool. There’s an opportunity to help consumers further understand and apply MyPlate recommendations to meals people eat in bowls, too. Using specific visual cues, images, and icons are effective ways to educate the public. MyBowl helps illustrate and extend the message that all food groups can fit into all meals, even those traditionally served in bowls like cereal breakfast, soup, and salads. 95% of RDs expect the MyBowl graphic to be used in addition to MyPlate.

Like MyPlate, MyBowl is a simple visual cue to help people get the most nutrition from meals served in bowls. MyBowl is a simple tool that helps people understand how specific foods fit into “food groups”, like how a cereal breakfast with fruit delivers servings from “grains, dairy and fruit food groups”. MyBowl was purposefully created to match the features of MyPlate. The MyBowl colors are identical to those used in MyPlate. The positioning and size of the colored bands around MyBowl reflects different types and amounts of foods and food group combinations that could be enjoyed in a bowl. When used as an online interactive tool, the size and color of the bands around MyBowl will change to reflect the amount and type of foods actually in the bowl. ChooseMyBowl.com is an interactive site that features tips, tools and meal plans to show people how to make smart choices and enjoy a variety of food groups and nutrients in delicious bowl meals.

People need help starting the day with a balanced breakfast; research shows:

  • While more than half of all adults would like to eat breakfast every day, only one-third actually do.
  • Nearly all moms want their kids to eat breakfast every day; however, 40% of moms report their child doesn’t eat breakfast daily.
  • While nearly all toddlers and preschool-age children are eating breakfast, consumption of breakfast decreases as American children grow older. 77% of young children eat breakfast every day, but the number falls to 50% in the middle-school years and 36% among high school students.
  • The latest research from the International Food Information Council (IFIC) shows people who eat breakfast regularly have higher intakes of several vitamin and minerals.
  • The same research noted that breakfast skippers may not make up for missed nutrients at other meals during the day.

MyBowl helps people realize that eating breakfast can be a fast and easy solution to achieving a varied diet and meeting nutrient needs.

When it comes to breakfast, cereal with non-fat milk is a nutrient-dense choice eaten in a bowl, delivering several essential nutrients in less than 150 kcal per serving, on average. Cereal with milk is the leading source of 10 nutrients in children’s diets and provides four nutrients, including fiber, most likely to be lacking in kids’ diets. Cereal with milk may deliver good or excellent sources of the 4 nutrients of concern- calcium, potassium, vitamin D, and fiber. Studies show that cereal eaters have higher intakes of many essential nutrients including B vitamins, calcium, vitamin A, and vitamin D. Numerous studies show that a cereal breakfast is associated with a lower BMI in both children and adults. Cereal with milk is an affordable breakfast option- costing just 50 cents per serving, on average.

A cereal breakfast can help Americans get more fiber, which was noted in the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans as a “nutrient of concern”. Nine out of ten Americans don’t meet daily recommendations for fiber. On average, Americans consume just about half of the required fiber that they need each day. Many experts think Americans poor fiber intake is a public health concern for both adults and children, with potential consequences that may increase the risk for several chronic diseases and obesity. In a recent survey, 90% of RDs agreed that a cereal breakfast is one of the best ways to easily increase fiber intake. On average, Americans only get 18% of their daily fiber at breakfast.

The MyPlate design published by the USDA. This replaced the MyPyramid in June 2011, ending 19 years of USDA food guide diagrams.