RDN… Hmm, Interesting

Every RD is a Nutritionist. But NOT every Nutritionist is a RD.

What is this new credential they are calling a “RDN”?

Well, the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (AND) Board of Directors and the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR) have recently approved the optional use of the credential “Registered Dietitian Nutritionist” (RDN) used by Registered Dietitians now.

The new optional RDN credential will not affect licensure or other state regulations. Plus many state licensure/certification laws already use the term “Nutritionist” (i.e.: LDN or CDN)

Many people, and especially RDs, are wondering why the Academy is offering this new credential. The reasoning behind this is to further enhance the RD brand and more accurately reflect to consumers who RDs are and what they do. This makes sense, when the Academy puts it like this…

This will distinguish the demanding credential requirements and focus that all RDs are Nutritionists but NOT all Nutritionists are RDs.  

The inclusion of the word “Nutritionist” in the credential itself, communicates a larger concept of wellness and treatment of conditions. This option is also consistent with the inclusion of the word “nutrition” in the Academy’s new name. Again, this makes sense and definitely seems innovative for the future of the Academy.

There is an increased awareness of the Academy’s role as a key organization in food and nutrition by media, government agencies, allied health organizations and consumers. This provides additional rationale for the incorporation of the word “nutrition” into the RD credential resulting in the optional RDN credential.  

But, here lies a substantial question… Was there any AND member input considered?

In 2010, the Academy began exploring the option of offering the RDN credential. It was supported by participants in the 2011 Future Connections Summit and most recently by the Council on Future Practice in its 2012 Visioning Report. The recommendation was shared and discussed in the House of Delegates at the Fall 2012 meeting. The 2013 joint meeting of the major organizational units (CDR, Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics (ACEND), Council on Future Practice, Education Committee, and Nutrition and Dietetics Educators and Preceptors (DPG)) supported moving forward.

But here is my question- Do RDs have to use the RDN credential now?

No. The RDN credential is offered as an option to RDs who want to emphasize the nutrition aspect of their credential to the public and to other health practitioners. Plus, the new RDN credential has the exact same meaning and legal trademark definitions as the RD credential.

The credentials should be used, identical as a RD credential.

So, for example: Jess Brantner, RD = Jess Brantner, RDN. —-> (In time my friends… In good time)

The new RDN credential should be prioritized just like a RD credential, when other credentials are involved. So, 1st– Graduate degree credential, 2nd– RDN or RD, 3rd– special certifications with the CDR (CSSD, CSO, CSP, CSG, CSR), 4th– licensure designation or other certifications like Certified Diabetes Educator (CDE).

Here is the twist to my story- the CDR registration identification cards WILL include both the RD AND RDN credentials. So, be on the lookout for your 2013-2014 CDR registration identification cards, because it will have both credentials listed! But, don’t worry about costs, because there will be no additional fee for all these changes.

The opportunity to use the RDN credential is offered to RDs who want to directly convey the nutrition aspects of their training and expertise.

“This option reflects who Registered Dietitians are and what we do,” says Registered Dietitian Nutritionist and Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics President Ethan Bergman. “The message for the public is: Look for the RD – and now, the RDN – credential when determining who is the best source of safe and accurate nutrition information,” Bergman says. “All Registered Dietitians are Nutritionists, but not all Nutritionists are Registered Dietitians. So when you’re looking for qualified food and nutrition experts, look for the RD or RDN credential.”

AND RDN

Happy RDN Day?

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Happy RD Day!

Happy Registered Dietitian (RD) Day!!

March 13th celebrates Registered Dietitian Day! This celebration occurs every year during National Nutrition Month, which is March. RDs are the public’s go-to healthcare professionals when they need reliable nutrition information, in this field. RDs pull from their experience to create a personalized nutrition plan for people of every age. These are the professionals that are able to separate facts from fads and translate nutritional science into information you, the consumer/client/patient, can use!

Dietitians can improve the health of Americans and save money through healthcare costs. Medical nutrition therapy (MNT) provided by RDs is critical in preventing the top 3 chronic illnesses. It is well documented that MNT is associated with a decrease in utilization of hospital services of 9.5% for patients with diabetes and 8.6% for patients with cardiovascular disease. Also noteworthy is that participation in community-based programs that focused on improving nutrition and increasing physical activity had a 58% decrease in incidence of Type 2 Diabetes.

Registered Dietitians assist to promote a net decrease in healthcare utilization and costs for most people. The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation estimates that in Idaho, for every $1 spent in wellness programs, companies could save $3.27 in medical costs and $2.73 in absenteeism costs. Some interventions have been shown to help improve nutrition and activity habits in just 1 year and had a return of $1.17 for every $1 spent. Reducing the average BMI in the state of Idaho by 5% could lead to health care savings of more than $1 billion in 10 years and $3 billion in 20 years.

Well, unfortunately Wild and Wonderful West Virginia isn’t as lucky as ole Idaho. West Virginia still leads the nation in obesity, and was recently named the state with the highest number of overweight residents in the union. According to the 2012 Gallup-Healthways Well-being Index released last week, 33.5% of West Virginia’s population is considered obese.

Mississippi is the closest with an obesity rate of 32.2%. Arkansas has a rate of 31.4%, Louisiana is 30.9% and Alabama is listed at 30.4%, to round out the top five.

Residents of the Mountain State believe that a reason for the high obesity rate is the change in physical jobs and increase in availability of fast food. The combination of lack of physical activity and the ready access of fast food and junk food in homes has really contributed to the epidemic. On the flip side of our state, nutrition-related efforts seem to be working as West Virginia is no longer in the top five for childhood obesity!

With the help from schools and communities, West Virginia is increasing physical activity and need for healthier foods. As a unit we are advocating and promoting activity and nutrition. I think it seems to be helping! All thanks to those RDs out there!!!

Job outlook: According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Nutrition and Dietetics careers are expected to increase much faster (by 20%) than other jobs by 2020 and faster than many other industries within health care. In 2010, the median annual salary for RDs was $53,250, at $23.60 an hour. And the number of jobs available in the nutrition and dietetics field was 64,400.

Money Bags

Bureau of Labor Statistics

Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics

Fat West Virginia

Nutrition in the Community

RD Day 2013

RD Day

What Parents Need to Know

It’s no secret that America has a childhood obesity epidemic. The health risks that can accompany childhood obesity are so regularly featured on news reports that it’s amazing the problem is still so prevalent. And although many parents can identify a weight problem in their child, they might not know what to do about it, especially when it comes to handling the situation without damaging her self-esteem. Here is some food for thought for parents of overweight children, along with some practical, real-life advice for handling the situation.

Your Doctor Might Not Tell You

Your doctor might not let you know that your child is overweight or obese. This may be because he assumes you do not want to know. As a parent, it is easy to turn a blind eye to things like your kids being overweight or even when your kids develop a bad habit. If you have a suspicion that your child is overweight, you should approach your doctor about it. This will show him that you are interested in learning more about the issue and are willing to work with his suggestions on what to change or tweak in your child’s life.

You Are Not Alone

Sometimes it’s difficult to realize that you are not the only one with overweight kids. There are others out there who are just as concerned as you are and who are willing to share their wisdom. Search out those other parents and work together to achieve a common goal. That extra support is just the thing you need to keep on track, and having another overweight child working toward becoming a healthier size will help put your child at ease and encourage her to work hard at losing that extra weight.

Exercise Is Always a Good Thing

Not everyone enjoys exercise, but it’s essential for kids’ health and physical development. Come up with an exercise schedule that everyone in the household sticks to. There’s no reason to send your kid off to the gym for an aerobics class while you sit at home. Make it a family event that everyone looks forward to. If everyone likes to do something different, then create a schedule that includes all of the activities throughout the week. Working together as a family not only creates a built-in support system, it can also boost the health of everyone in the family and gives you an opportunity to model the habits you want your child to adopt.

She Shouldn’t Have to Make Changes Alone

Along the same lines as exercising with your child, don’t make them go through any aspect of this experience alone. Singling him out will just create tension and remorse that doesn’t need to be there at all. If the doctor says he needs to change his diet, change the diet of your entire family. Clean out that pantry of the junk food and fill it with healthier alternatives, encouraging everyone to eat better. Even members of your family at an average weight can benefit from cutting out the empty calories.

Some Foods Should Be Avoided

Going out for fast food three times a week is a bad habit to get into, regardless of how convenient it might be for time-strapped parents. All of the grease that is typical of fast food has no place in a child’s diet. And, keep in mind the word “diet” does not mean counting calories and starving your child. She still needs a decent amount of food. After all, she is growing and changing. With how much energy children burn throughout each day, chances are they need to eat more food than you would expect. They just need healthier fare than deep-fried potatoes and genetically modified meat.

Counting Calories Isn’t Always Right for Kids

The strict course of counting calories is a lot of pressure to put on a child and will single them out more than their weight already does. Stress can even be a trigger for kids and adults who are prone to emotional eating. So skip the added stress of counting calories and think about ways to instill healthier habits as a whole.

Your Child May Have Low Self-Esteem

It is possible that your child is being picked on at school or being made fun of by his peers because he is overweight, and he may very well be too embarrassed about the bullying to tell you about it. Sometimes kids don’t even necessarily mean to be cruel, but it can still feel that way to your child when his differences are being highlighted at every turn. If you think your child may be being picked on at school, speak with the guidance counselor to see what she has noticed and what she suggests that you do, but make sure that you’re making efforts to boost his self-esteem at home as well.

It’s Okay to Embrace Your Child’s Weight

Most importantly, embrace the way your child is no matter what. She should feel comfortable with who she is no matter what her weight is and understand that your focus on her weight is out of concern for her health rather than an emphasis on her looks. Just because she is overweight doesn’t mean she’s not a good child, and she needs to know that.

AuPair.org

fatty

Community Wellness Action Team Meeting

Undergraduate Action Team Meeting

Well, let’s see… As the Community Wellness ISPP (Individualized Supervised Practice Pathway) Dietetic Intern, it’s my responsibility to get my Action Team in the community and promoting nutrition education and overall healthy thinking and decision-making by Morgantown’s population. So, for this meeting that took place on Monday February 11th at 5:30pm on WVU’s Evansdale campus, we had a mapped out plan of what we needed to address and where we need to go, in terms of community wellness.

WV Action For Healthy Kids (AFHK) Undergraduate intern:

The Shack Neighborhood House Undergraduate Intern:

  • We’ve decided that most of our projects/presentations that we work on in our group, we will work as a team. I made this very clear at the very first meeting. I want to make sure everyone is involved with everything. That being said, an after-school nutrition education program was assigned to this Undergrad intern. Thankfully, the intern has help from our Community Wellness Action Team. So, I already had the thought in my mind that I wanted an after-school program based on something similar to a Rachel Ray show where she travels around the country. I wanted to implement a program where children at the Shack Neighborhood House can get the opportunity at becoming exposed to different regions of the country and still have that nutrition component as well. So, we created a program called “Our Healthy Roadtrip”. This program will last 6 weeks long and be held every Monday from 4:15pm-5:15pm. Our start date is March 4th and we’ll need a minimum of 2 volunteers for every lesson. Each lesson will consist of a nutrition education component, a section on exposure to that specific region’s food habits, and then a snack and interactive activity for the students.
  • Another project is organizing the Oxfam Hunger Banquet, that the Undergrad intern has named Mountaineering Against Hunger. Right now the beginning process is in effect where committees are filling up. Then, once these 3 committees are fulfilled, then further actions like venue planning and food donations can take place.
  • Other projects and events that our Action Team is in the process of organizing is Father’s HAND, Cross-Country Casserole Club, and Family Fun Night.

The Children’s Discovery Museum of West Virginia Undergraduate Intern

  • All of the events for the CDMWV for the semester are, for the most part, set in stone and already organized. It is this intern’s responsibility to complete these tasks and delegate any other duties needed. This Undergrad intern is working with another Graduate student on developing a program called “Healthy Passport”.
  • I also assigned this intern to develop a timeline of all events that take place at the CDMWV throughout the entire semester. This way, we can organize, and possibly even collaborate with another organization, other events and programming within the Morgantown, WV area.

As a Community Wellness Action Team I have decided that we will have our own National Nutrition Month campaign. National Nutrition Month is celebrated throughout the entire month of March and this year’s theme is “Eat Right, Your Way, Every Day”. Specifically, March 13th is National Registered Dietitian (RD) Day.

Sooo…… I think I somewhat caught my team off guard by telling them my idea. I want us to use guerrilla marketing with National Nutrition Month and utilize the Student Dietetic Association to do so. My plan is to recruit HN&F students to draw USDA’s MyPlates ALL over the Morgantown area, specifically on all 3 campuses, in different colored sidewalk chalk. And I plan on having people doing so on a daily basis, in case weather prevents us from our guerrilla nutrition parade. Then, on March 19th, the Student Dietetic Association will have a table outside of the Mountainlair on the downtown campus and have a GIANT MyPlate drawing in front of our table on the ground. At our table we’ll have lot of fun interactive nutrition activities, handouts, healthy recipes, healthy snacks, and food guide pyramids from all over the world, including USDA’s MyPlate- of course. I think this will be a really innovative and unique approach at National Nutrition Month (NNM)  and promoting health awareness on a large scale.

USDA MyPlate Food Guide

USDA MyPlate Food Guide

One of the intern's assigned projects

One of the intern’s assigned projects

The Shack Neighborhood House. A primary stakeholder within our program!

The Shack Neighborhood House. A primary stakeholder within our program!

WV AFHK is a stakeholder within our ISPP Dietetic Internship

WV AFHK is a stakeholder within our ISPP Dietetic Internship

The Children's Discovery Museum of WV collaborates with our program for special eventing and nutrition programming on several different levels.

The Children’s Discovery Museum of WV collaborates with our program for special eventing and nutrition programming on several different levels.

This year's NNM theme for 2013

This year’s NNM theme for 2013

 

 

 

 

Love Your Heart Fun Lunch

Love Your Heart Fun Lunch- The Main Event

Well, the day finally arrived! Saturday February 2, 2013- The “Love Your Heart Fun Lunch” free heart screening event took place at the WVU Heart Institute in the Suncrest Towne Centre. The ISPP Dietetic Internship was there and we were ready to educate the community all about…. (drum roll please)… PORTION DISTORTION! Since the ISPP Dietetic Internship has an Emphasis Area of “Leadership in Community Wellness”, our table was geared towards addressing what so many Americans find themselves becoming confused about- serving sizes, portion control, and easy ways to remember how to stay healthy.

Our table consisted of the following informational material:

  • Portion distortion flyer
  • Serving sizes- comparing inanimate objects to correct serving sizes
  • Plate proportions
  • Quick, easy recipes for on-the-go people
  • Antioxidants handouts
  • Mindful eating flyer and handouts
  • Incentives- food diary, brochures of the TLC Diet, and Walnuts- relative to heart health

We were asked by the coordinators of the event to wear a red shirt and dress pants. All of the table covers were provided by the staff and they even provided tape for me to use when I was setting up and hanging our “How Well Do You Know Your Portions” poster. The participants received a stamp from the ISPP Dietetic Internship table when they walked through our demonstrations and interacted with our activities. These stamps went on a participant bingo card, which entered them for a chance to win a door prize if they visited each table in the waiting area. Our first activity at our table was Kaylyn’s “Fast Food Quiz”, which was very intriguing to everyone at the event. Our second interactive, hands-on activity was a portion exercise I created. I had two bowls displayed in front of a bowl of rice. The purpose was to have participants portion out how much they thought a normal portion of brown rice was, then portion the appropriate amount into the other bowl to compare the two bowls side-by-side. Only four people tried the activity so, maybe next time I try to implement something like this again, I should include directions displayed for participants to see so there’s no confusion. Overall, the event was a real success for the WVU ISPP. Everyone seemed really open and receptive to the information we were providing to them.

Two-thirds of the ISPP Dietetic Internship ready to promote nutrition literacy!

Two-thirds of the ISPP Dietetic Internship ready to promote nutrition literacy!

 

Portion Distortion!!

Portion Distortion!!

 

Educating a participant on portions and serving sizes. Most people were quite surprised about the size of a "typical" dinner plate and its effects on portion control.

Educating a participant on portions and serving sizes. Most people were quite surprised about the size of a “typical” dinner plate and its effects on portion control.

 

WVU ISPP Dietetic Internship!!

WVU ISPP Dietetic Internship!!

 

An up-close look at our table and handouts!

An up-close look at our table and handouts!

 

 

Love Your Heart Fun Lunch Set-Up

Love Your Heart (The Before)

I got to sneak a picture of the sign when you enter the 2nd floor of the WVU Heart Institute

I got to sneak a picture of the sign when you enter the 2nd floor of the WVU Heart Institute

On Friday February 1st, the ISPP and GDI Interns were asked to come to the WVU Heart Institute to set up for the upcoming event that was taking place the next day. Elaine Bowen, a WVU Extension Specialist, asked us to attend the “Love Your Heart Fun Lunch” event. This event is a free health screening fair that participants attend, on a first come, first serve basis. The day before the event, volunteers and coordinators took time out of their day to prepare for the health screening extravaganza. Volunteers from the School of Nursing and the School of Pharmacy, from WVU’s Health Sciences campus (HSC), were in attendance at the set up event. It was communicated that we, “nutrition people”, arrive to start help setting up at 5pm on that Friday. Well, since there was only two ISPP Dietetic Interns (including myself) that were going to be responsible for our “Community Nutrition” table, I told Kaylyn (the other ISPP Dietetic Intern) that I would go to the set up event. I did this because there really was no reason to have two people setting up our table. I arrived with my materials, posters, handouts, and other nutrition equipment and waited for instructions, with other students from HSC. To my surprise, when introductions from coordinators started to begin, I was introduced to the whole group of students because I was the only nutrition person who arrived to set up prior to the event. The GDI Interns were administering the screening process (meal planning) of the health fair and the ISPP Interns were responsible for a “Community Nutrition” table in the waiting area for participants to interact with and gain a little more health-related information. Since I was the only nutrition person to attend the event set-up, this gave me a few opportunities to take time to meet everyone that was involved in the planning and organizing of the event. The coordinators provided everyone with an itinerary and a map of the heart screening. The coordinators also shared with the group a Proclamation signed by the Governor of West Virginia, which was my first time seeing anything like that before. Then, the other volunteers were given a tour of each station of the heart screening maze for the next day. Since the ISPP Dietetic Internship table was in the waiting area with other community partners, like the School of Dentistry and EMS, I opted to help others move furniture and carry items inside from coordinator’s cars. I actually ended up getting the ISPP table set up fairly quick so, I helped with anything that anyone needed help with. Overall, I’m glad I came to set up because it made the next morning less stressful for Kaylyn and I. I also had the opportunity to network with other students and faculty in WVU health-related fields.

heart setup_itin

heart setup_itinn

heart setup_itinnn

Starting from the left side of our "community Nutrition" table

Starting from the left side of our “Community Nutrition” table

The middle section of our table- pre-event status

The middle section of our table- pre-event status

And the right side of our table. The only piece to this puzzle that was missing was Kaylyn's "Fast Food Quiz", which she brought the next mooring.

And the right side of our table. The only piece to this puzzle that was missing was Kaylyn’s “Fast Food Quiz”, which she brought the next morning.

A visual I created for participants to realize what the MyPlate actually looks like, compared to an actual oversized plate that most Americans use in their home on a daily rate.

A visual I created for participants to realize what the MyPlate actually looks like, compared to an actual oversized plate that most Americans use in their home on a daily basis.

The volunteer's map of the heart screen- to look over in case participants need help finding stations the next day.

The volunteer’s map of the heart screen- to look over in case participants need help finding stations the next day.

Overall- what the ISPP Dietetic Internship Community Nutrition table looked like the night before the event took place!

Overall- what the ISPP Dietetic Internship Community Nutrition table looked like the night before the event took place!

Leadership in Community Wellness: Undergraduates Action Team Meeting

Community Nutrition Action Team Engage!

As an ISPP Dietetic Intern, we have an emphasis area of “Leadership in Community Wellness”. Therefore, each intern is assigned an Action Team based on an area of “LCW” that we are most associated with. I am the ISPP Dietetic Intern responsible for the Extended Community Wellness Action Team. This team is comprised of WVU Human Nutrition & Foods students that applied for positions as Undergraduate Interns (HN&F 495 Independent Study credit).

The first Extended Community Undergraduate Intern Action Team meeting took place this week on Tuesday January 29th. On the action team, I have an undergraduate intern for (1) WV Action For Healthy Kids, (1) Children’s Discovery Museum of West Virginia, and (1) The Shack Neighborhood House and Davis College of Agriculture, Natural Resources, and Design. Bringing my team to a total of 3 students. In our meeting, I distributed tables of meetings, projects, programs, and presentations that each undergrad intern will be responsible for throughout the semester. I distributed all 4 tables to each student on my action team so, everyone knows what everyone else is doing and playing a role in. I think this will help prevent any confusion as to what each undergrad intern’s role will be throughout the semester.

As a team, I expect all 3 students to attend all Action Team meetings, as well as keeping notes of every meeting and emailing these notes to me by the Sunday after our meeting. This way I can see if the students understand their role on the Extended Community Wellness Action Team and if anything needs to be clarified at the next meeting. Currently, I have told this Action Team that our focus is to get “The Casserole Club” organized and lessons start being developed. At the end of the semester, I expect a PowerPoint presentation of what everyone completed throughout the semester. This presentation may OR may not be a group presentation, depending if our final meeting is concurrent with the other Action Teams (Collegiate, Worksite, Social Media).

AFHK Undergraduate Intern

  • Current involvement
    • Newsletter
    • Facebook page- keep a documented file of all your posts
    • Grant workshop
      • Document all meeting notes about workshop
      • Save and email all supplemental materials from workshop
  • Meetings
    • Document all meetings attended and submit
    • WV AFHK chapter meetings
    • SWAB meetings
  • Semester project
    • Create a nutrition education program based on an AFHK theme/idea
      • This theme does not have to be Smarter Lunchrooms
      • This project can be utilized within the Community Undergraduate Internship Action Team
        • Can work with SNH or CDM of WV to utilize child/adolescent populated organizations
      • BE CREATIVE!!
  • Compose a 1 page (maximum) article based on a topic given by Community ISPP Dietetic Intern
    • Post article on AFHK Facebook page
    • Submit on Ecampus by deadline
    • These topics that will be assigned by Intern, will be based on your AFHK project

Children’s Discovery Museum of WV

  • Timeline of all CDMWV events for entire semester
    • Nutrition and non-nutrition related
    • Due: February17th, 2013
    • Meetings
      • Schedule regular meetings with Katie Bulian
      • Projects
        • Develop a strategic plan for CDMWV’s Facebook page
          • Post pictures on their page
          • Tag them in articles posted
          • Create publicity for the CDMWV through Facebook applications
          • Document all Facebook activity with CDMWV
  • Healthy Passport” nutrition programming

 

Davis College of Agriculture, Natural Resources, and Design

  • Meetings
    • Oxfam Hunger Banquet: Mountaineering Against Hunger  planning meetings
    • Food Day/Week planning meetings
    • Projects
      • Oxfam Hunger Banquet: “Mountaineering Against Hunger
        • Instructions outlined in binder and table
        • Decided to schedule event on a Saturday
        • Committees: (1) Publicity, (2) Logistics, and (3) Planning
        • Find a venue
        • Set a date- late semester event (nice weather)
        • Food Day/Week
          • Different from National Food Day (normally held in October)
          • Plan event near/around Oxfam Hunger Banquet
          • Ideas: Plan Food Day/Week building up to Oxfam Hunger Banquet (Saturday)
          • Collaborate with cross-campus organizations involvement
          • Find venue(s)
          • Set a date(s)- late semester (nice weather, possibly outside events?)

Shack Neighborhood House

  • “Happy School”- A program for new, young parents with young children that meet Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday 9:30am-12pm. So, our program would either take place Tuesday or Thursday 10am-11am OR 11am-12pm.
    • The Casserole Club
      • Focusing on food culture
      • 8 week program
      • Supply recipes from http://recipefinder.nal.usda.gov/
      • Meetings
        • Attend a min. of 1 United Way meeting
          • ISPP Dietetic Intern will determine a calendar of meetings in the Morgantown area
          • Projects
            • After-school programming
              • Brainstorming with Lauren Gerchufsky to work with AFHK on program ideas
              • 8 week program
                • Monday afternoons are still available at the SNH, as they were in the Fall 2012 semester
  • Family Fun Night
    • Every third Tuesday and Thursday of the month 6pm-8pm
  • Father’s HAND
    • Every Thursday 6pm-8pm
    • Prefers to have male HNF student to present
    • Interested in cooking classes
  • Rosenbaum House
    • SNH recently just received a small grant that they plan on using towards preparing easy, healthy recipes and delivering/serving clients. They are interested in having HNF students help.
    • Jess is waiting to find out more information about the process

     

http://www.the-shack.org/

http://thefunfactory.org/

http://www.pierpont.edu/schoolofhumanservices/wv-child-nutrition-center/west-virginia-action-healthy-kids

CDM

 

 

Oxfam

SNH

wvafhklogo

The Never-Ending Week of Nutrition

What a week I have had! Let’s map this week out thus far…

Monday

  • WVU Agricultural Sciences Annex Test Kitchen audit 4pm-6:30pm; 7:30pm-9pm
  • Student Dietetic Association meeting 6:30pm

Tuesday

  • ISPP Action Team Undergraduate Intern meeting 6:30pm
  • Action For Healthy Kids
  • Shack Neighborhood House
  • Children’s Discovery Museum of WV
  • Davis College of Agriculture, Natural Resources, and Design

Wednesday

  • A Taste Around the World: “A Mountaineer Mexican Fiesta”
  • A program educating students on campus (undergraduates/graduates) about food culture awareness, nutrition education, and culinary skill-building.
  • Located at the Ag Sciences Annex Test Kitchen 6pm-8pm

Thursday

  • Organized information and recruitment for an event that the WVU School of Pharmacy invited us to.
  • The information was presented to the West Virginia Grief Center.
  • Thursday Jan 31st 5:45pm; Present information at approximately 6:15pm

Friday

  • Women Love Your Heart Health Screening set-up
  • Friday Feb. 1st 5pm

Saturday

  • Women Love Your Heart Health Screening main event
  • Saturday Feb. 2nd 7:30am-2pm

 

So, stay tuned ladies and gentleman… You’ll be reading some very interesting community nutrition blogs within the next few days!